The first “flying” motorcycle: what it’s for

David Mayman, founder of JetPack Aviation, says he fell in love with flying: “A Cessna plane will sail at 120 mph.” Here’s what this innovative motorcycle entails.

However, he did not just want to fly. His ten-year-old company, based in California, creates jet packs and trains both civilians and military personnel on how to fly them, although at $ 4,950 for a two-day program, it’s not really for casual enthusiasts.

There is only one problem with this unusual career: Mayman himself is afraid of heights. In an interview focused primarily on JetPack Aviation’s new flying motorcycle, the Speeder, Mayman said he believes it will shape the future of aviation.

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This flying motorcycle has several advantages

Speeder is an air utility vehicle. To some extent, it is moving away from the concept of a flying motorcycle, because when people think of motorcycles, they think of recreation. The main use case is indeed emergency response and disaster relief, rather than recreational.

Imagine it was a hurricane. Roads are damaged, you can’t put trucks on the road – they can fly almost at any time – even if it’s rainy and you can’t see the horizon.

“It simply came to our notice then. You could have a wind of 40-50 mph and our boat will still be solid. I think recreational use will be in phase 2 or phase 3, “David Mayman told Futurism.

We learn that if it flies at 6,000 meters, it will do so because it is a mountainous terrain.

“It is usually designed to fly three hundred meters above ground level. In the Himalayas you can fly at 6,000 meters. It could be operated autonomously, it can send medical supplies to where it needs to fly at that altitude. A pilot would only need oxygen, “Mayman said.

Asked how fast it will be, Mayman replied, “Incredibly fast. A Cessna plane will sail at 120 mph.

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