Home LifeStyle The place where heaven and earth meet: how to get to Salar...

The place where heaven and earth meet: how to get to Salar de Uyuni

686
0

Salary de Uyuni from Bolivia can be an incredible experience. Salar de Uyuni in Bolivia is considered one of the most extreme and remarkable views in all of South America, if not the world.

Spanning more than 4,050 square miles of the Altiplano, it is the largest area of ​​salt in the world, left behind by prehistoric lakes that evaporated long ago. Here, a thick crust of salt extends to the horizon, covered with quilted, polygonal patterns of salt rising from the ground.

At certain times of the year, nearby lakes overflow and a thin layer of water turns the surface into an amazing reflection of the sky. This beautiful view, as if from another world, serves as a place to extract salt and lithium – the element responsible for powering laptops, smartphones and electric cars. In addition to the local workers who harvest these minerals, the landscape is home to the world’s first salt hotel and is populated by tourists.

Read:  The Found Footage Phenomenon, the documentary that explains why the Blair Witch Project or Paranormal Activity scared you so much

Salary of Uyuni, a unique place

This unique place is located in the central point of Bolivia, Chile and Argentina. Salar de Uyuni has two distinct seasons. The rainy season (December to April) is the time when visitors come to witness the stunning mirror effect. During the dry season (May to November), temperatures are lower, the soil has hardened, and travelers can admire the scenery in areas that are not accessible in the rainy season. Tour operators consider the period from June to August the best time.

While salt pans are one of Bolivia’s most popular attractions, they are only a small part of the beautiful Altiplano region. Many visitors indulge in a three-day (or longer) tour that includes deserts, volcanoes, geysers, hot springs, and high-altitude lakes in the south. Excursions in San Pedro de Atacama and Tupiza are already scheduled to drive through these sites.

Read:  David Cronenberg returns with Crimes of the Future: what we know so far about the director's new film behind Videodrome and The Fly

One of the highlights of Salar de Uyuni is an endless horizon that allows photographers to play with perspective and create true optical illusions.