Home LifeStyle The Aladdin-Superman connection: the Disney song that made US chart history

The Aladdin-Superman connection: the Disney song that made US chart history

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It seems that while at first glance it might not make sense that there is a connection between Aladdin and Superman, in reality it is as real as it gets.

During one of Aladdin’s first attempts to woo Princess Jasmine, he takes her for a walk on the magic carpet, allowing her to leave the palace and enjoy a new experience.

The romantic sequence unfolds to the tune that has since become synonymous with the film and has become a hit in its own right, “A Whole New World”.

In an interview, John Musker, one of the two producers, explained that Christopher Reeve’s version of Superman was a big influence on the song.

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“We wanted a musical scene, applied to a perfect date, where Aladdin takes Jasmine and they fly together on the carpet.

We were influenced by Superman where Christopher Reeve takes Lois Lane on a date. Did we know that A Whole New World would become a staple in skating shows over the next 30 years? No, but kudos to Alan Menken and Tim Rice for that. It has stood the test of time and become part of the fabric of American musical theatre,” he said.

“A Whole New World,” the first Disney song to reach the American charts

In 1992, “A Whole New World” became the first Disney animated movie song to top the U.S. Billboard Hot 100, demonstrating how much audiences actually appreciate the song.

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The inspiration coming straight from Superman for the song arguably gave “A Whole New World” the transcendent and jubilant quality that has attracted so many fans over the years, proving that essential influences can sometimes come from the least expected places.

Although the scene in Musker’s Superman is romantic and shares thematic elements with Aladdin and the song itself, the two productions are vastly different, but something unites them: an almost “hard to kill” love story.