Amazon sends Canadian women non-stop packages with shoes

A woman is currently sinking into cardboard boxes in Canada.  (Image: Master1305alphaspirit - adobe.stock.com)

A woman is currently sinking into cardboard boxes in Canada. (Image: Master1305/alphaspirit – adobe.stock.com)

Amazon delivers fast, but sometimes too fast.

I can’t sleep, I can’t eat, and I start shaking when I see a package left in front of my door. The Canadian Anca Nitu gets packages delivered almost every day that she didn’t order and doesn’t even want, as reported by CBC.

Inside are shoes – and not their size.

Where do the Amazon packages come from?

That happened: In the past two months, Ms. Nitu has received more than 50 packages of women’s shoes. The packages come from the USA and are without exception returns because they contain return slips. They were supposed to go to an Amazon seller, but they ended up in British Columbia with Ms. Nitu.

Particularly bizarre: Each package has the Canadian woman’s correct address and even an old cell phone number that she says hasn’t been used for four years.

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Bild: lovelyday12 - stock.adobe.com






Bild: lovelyday12 – stock.adobe.com

Since the packages are not handed over, but dropped off, UPS even charges delivery fees. They now amount to over 300 Canadian dollars (about 203 euros).

The exact cause has not yet been clarified, but it can be assumed that Ms. Nitu’s house is used as a return address by sellers or third parties to offload unwanted products.

Parcel shipping hassles are not unique, as this YouTuber has noted:

There’s a nasty trick behind it

The fact that the packages are explicitly going to Ms. Nitu made her suspicious. Someone has to send them there, right?

The Better Business Bureau (BBB) ​​provides an answer. This is the Canadian equivalent of the Consumer Protection Agency.

Here’s the trick: The incident involves a return model that bypasses fees from sellers, who are usually from overseas like China or India. They do this by using a residence to ship their returned products.

For overseas sellers, shipping, storage, and disposal fees add up much faster than they do for individuals. Therefore, it is cheaper for them to send unwanted goods to private addresses in the same region.

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The sellers probably got the Canadian woman’s address through phishing emails, or they bought her address and old cell phone number illegally somewhere – at least that’s the assumption of the victim.

Until Amazon has resolved the case, Ms. Nitu has no choice but to sit it out.

Ms. Nitu tries to fend off the packages with a note.  (Image: CBC)






Ms. Nitu tries to fend off the packages with a note. (Image: CBC)

To err is human, that’s why one gamer got a better graphics card than they ordered. Another received 10 SSDs from Amazon instead of one. Whether the people are allowed to keep their lucky finds is stated in the respective articles.

Ms. Nitu has been receiving return packages with shoes for months and hardly knows how to defend herself against them. Has anything similar ever happened to you? Or maybe you’re one of the lucky ones and got something that you didn’t even order? Feel free to write it in the comments.

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