REVIEW The Midnight Club – Mike Flanagan’s latest Netflix series

In case you’re at a loss for what to watch on Netflix, here’s a good idea: you can try The Midnight Club, which comes straight from horror master Mike Flanagan.

The miniseries tells the story of dying teenagers who fate brings together for a seemingly trivial reason.

The Midnight Club starts off slow, but it gets to your heart before you know it.

If you’ve seen even one show Mike Flanagan has made before, you might recognize the style: light-hearted script at the beginning, only to develop in a thousand different ways, all so that by the end you’re sorry it’s over.

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Somehow, with each of his series that at first glance seems quite commercial, the director manages to strike that chord you weren’t even aware you had. This is certainly happening now.

The Midnight Club is the name of the show to watch especially now, as Halloween approaches, but also the name of the small storytelling club of young people committed to an asylum where they await their deaths. They all suffer from incurable illnesses, and throughout the episodes, you feel their pain and inevitably wonder what it would be like for you to be in their shoes: to know you don’t have long to live. What do you do with the time you have left? How do you not waste it?

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Basically, the kids use The Midnight Club to tell night after night of their own made-up horror stories. This gives Flanagan the opportunity to make a kind of matroska out of the miniseries. In each episode you have a story told by one of the patients, as they finally interconnect in the landscape, brought together by the overarching story of their suffering.

So if you have a little time to spare, give Netflix’s The Midnight Club a shot, because you won’t regret it.

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