Ranking the Royals

 

The Top 300 Players in Kansas City Royals history as determined by the Modified Production Index Batters and Pitchers Formula.  The formulas are as follows:

 

The Modified Production Index Formula for Batters is as follows:

  • (Batting Average x 1000)
  • + (RBIs – Home Runs)
  • + Intentional Walks
  • + Hit By Pitch
  • + Runs
  • + Total Bases
  • + (Stolen Bases-Caught Stealing)
  • + Caught Stealing
  • – minus Ground into Double Plays
  • =

 

The Modified Production Index Formula for Pitchers is as follows:

 

  • 150 – (ERA x 15)
  • plus Wins
  • plus (Winning Pct x 150)
  • plus (Saves x 10)
  • plus (Holds x 6.67)
  • plus Game Appearances
  • plus Games Started
  • plus (Innings Pitched x 3)
  • plus (Caught Stealing – Stolen Bases)
  • plus Pickoffs
  • plus Ground into Double Plays
  • minus Totals Bases
  • minus Blown Saves
  • minus Earned Runs
  • minus Walks
  • minus Intentional Walks
  • minus Wild Pitches
  • minus Hit Batters
  • minus Balks

 

#300 – Terry Pendleton (6) – Designated Hitter (1998) – 435th Player

MPI Ranking:  395.38

March 31, 1998 – OPENING DAY – Started Game – Top of the 2nd, no outs (DH)

September 25, 1998 – End of Game

Former National League MVP Terry Pendleton was signed by the Royals as a free agent after playing for the Cincinnati Reds.  He was brought to Kansas City as an experienced hitter to help mentor the young hitting roster of Kansas City.  Pendleton was the designated hitter on opening day for the Kansas City Royals in 1998.  He hit .257 for the Royals with three home runs for the season.  Pendleton retired from major league baseball at the conclusion of the season.


#299 – Chad Durbin (33) – Starting Pitcher (1999-2002) – 476th Player

MPI Ranking:  395.83

September 26, 1999 – Bottom of the 4th, Two outs

April 11, 2002 – End of the Bottom of the 4th

He made his major league debut with Kansas City.  He split much of his career between the minors and the Royals.  Durbin finished his Royals career 11-22 with a 6.01 ERA.


#298 – Brad Wellman (3) – Utility Infield (1988-1989) – 255th Player

MPI Ranking:  396.61

April 6, 1988 – Top of the 9th, no outs

October 1, 1989 – End of Game

He primarily played second base and shortstop in his two years with the Royals with a .246 batting average in 174 games played.  Wellman ended his major league career at the end of the 1989 season.


#297 – Butch Davis (33) – Left Field (1983-1984) – 199th Player

MPI Ranking:  396.90

August 23, 1983 – Started Game

July 14, 1984 – End of Game

He made his major league debut for the Royals.  In only 33 games played in 1983, Butch Davis tied with three others Royals players as the team leader in triples with six.  He became the Royals’ opening day starter in left field in 1984, but only played a short time with the Royals.  Davis batted .248 with Kansas City.


#296 – Joel Peralta (57) – Middle Relief Pitcher (2006-2008) – 625th Player

MPI Ranking:  400.45

April 17, 2006 – Bottom of the 6th, One out

September 21, 2008 – End of Game

Joel Peralta became a major part of the bullpen in 2006, making 64 appearances in relief and striking out 57.  He made 62 appearances in 2007 with an improved 3.80 ERA.  Peralta had a 3-8 record in 214 innings pitched and a career 4.54 ERA.


#295 – Chuck Knoblauch (11) – Left Field (2002) – 517th Player

MPI Ranking:  401.01

April 1, 2002 – OPENING DAY – Started Game

September 27, 2002 – End of Game

Knoblauch 2002 season start was like a bang with a grand slam.  However, from there, things began to go down fast.  Knoblauch suffered from a condition many players call “the yips,” in which he began to lose control of fielding the ball or throwing.  His fielding deteriorated, which caused him to struggle at the plate.  He ended his Royals season with a .210 batting average.


#294 – Matt Whisenant (56) – Middle Relief Pitcher (1997-1999) – 428th Player

MPI Ranking:  403.70

July 30, 1997 – Top of the 4th, no outs

August 12, 1999 – End of Game

Whisenant, a left-handed pitcher, pitched 19 innings in 24 appearances with the Royals after arriving and posted a 2.84 ERA.  In 1998, Whisenant pitched in 70 games and struck out 45 in 60 2/3 innings.  He is credited with 26 holds as a middle relief pitcher in his Royals career and had a career ERA of 5.05.


#293 – Ricky Bottalico (52) – Closing Pitcher (2000) – 482nd Player

MPI Ranking:  406.21

April 5, 2000 – Bottom of the 9th, no outs

October 1, 2000 – End of Game

Ricky Bottalico was the closing pitcher for Kansas City in 2000.  He finished the season with a 4.63 ERA and 16 saves in 62 appearances.


#292 – Kila Ka’aihue (25) – First Base (2008-2011) – 681st Player

MPI Ranking:  406.55

September 4, 2008 – SECOND GAME – Bottom of the 6th, no outs

May 4, 2011 – End of Game

Kila Ka’aihue was the first native Hawaiian in the Royals history.  In 2011, the Royals planned on starting rookie Eric Hosmer at first base, but due to an injury, the Royals promoted Ka’aihue to the position on opening day.  Ka’aihue hit a career .216 batting average with the Royals with 11 home runs in 87 games played.


#291 – Jose Santiago (46) – Middle Relief Pitcher (1997-2001) – 420th Player

MPI Ranking:  407.31

June 7, 1997 – Top of the 9th, Two outs

June 3, 2001 – End of the Bottom of the 5th

He made his major league debut with the Royals.  Although he bounced back and forth from Kansas City to the minors, Santiago pitched in 105 games with a 13-12 record while in Kansas City.


#290 – Chuck Harrison (7) – First Base (1969-1971) – 1st Player

MPI Ranking:  411.10

First Game – April 8, 1969 – OPENING DAY – Started Game

Last Game – September 25, 1971 – SECOND GAME – End of Game

He was the first-ever first baseman in franchise history.  He played parts of two seasons with Kansas City as a backup first baseman and pinch hitter.  He hit .219 with Kansas City.  After the 1971 season, Harrison never played in the major leagues again.


#289 – Jerry Don Gleaton (39) – Middle Relief Pitcher (1987-1989) – 243rd Player

MPI Ranking:  412.09

May 5, 1987 – Top of the 9th, no outs

September 23, 1989 – End of the Top of the 8th

Jerry Don Gleaton (one of the few players in major league history to use all three names regularly),became a regular left-hander in the bullpen, pitching 50 2/3  innings in his first season in 48 appearances.  He finished his Royals career with a 4.19 ERA in 105 relief appearances.


#288 – Billy Brewer (41) – Middle Relief Pitcher (1993-1995) – 347th Player

MPI Ranking:  412.73

April 8, 1993 – Top of the 8th, no outs

September 29, 1995 – End of Game

Billy Brewer was selected in the 1992 Rule 5 Draft.  He became a left-handed situational relief pitcher for the Royals over the next three seasons.  He had a career 8-7 record with a 3.95 ERA in 144 appearances for the Royals.  He also earned 24 career holds as a middle relief pitcher in Kansas City.


#287 – Leon Roberts (16) – Utility Outfield (1983-1984) – 193rd Player

MPI Ranking:  413.94

April 26, 1983 – Started Game

September 30, 1984 – End of Game

Roberts played as a backup outfielder for the 1983 season with 84 appearances.  He hit .258 with eight home runs in his first season in Kansas City.  Roberts finished his major league career with Kansas City batting .252.


#286 – Chad Kreuter (19) – Catcher (1999) – 455th Player

MPI Ranking:  414.31

April 5, 1999 – OPENING DAY – Started Game

October 2, 1999 – End of Game

Kreuter had mediocre hitting in his one season with the Royals, only hitting .225 with five home runs in 85 starts as catcher. He played a total of 107 games for the Royals and logged 767 1/3 innings as catcher.


#285 – Hubie Brooks (30) – Utility Outfield (1993-1994) – 349th Player

MPI Ranking:  415.74

April 9, 1993 – Bottom of the 9th, Two outs

July 2, 1994 – End of Game

Veteran Hubie Brooks signed with the Royals in 1993.  He made 109 appearances with the Royals over two seasons with a .274 batting average  He was used half of his games in 1993 as a pinch hitter, batting .303 in that situation.  This ended his major league career with Kansas City.  


#284 – Mike Minor (26) – Middle Relief Pitcher (2017) – 838th Player

MPI Ranking:  421.09

April 3, 2017 – Bottom of the 8th, no outs

September 30, 2017 – End of Game

He was signed while still recovering from shoulder surgery and did not play until 2017.  Although pitching as a starter for his entire career, the Royals placed him in the bullpen to pitch long relief.  He became one of the best pitchers in relief for Kansas City, pitching a 1.87 ERA prior to the All-Star Break.  He finished the season pitching in 65 appearances with the Royals with a 2.55 ERA and 88 strikeouts in 77 2/3 innings pitched.


#283 – Shane Halter (4) – Utility Player (1997-1998) – 414th Player

MPI Ranking:  422.59

April 6, 1997 – Top of the 9th, One out

September 24, 1998 – End of Game

Halter made his major league debut with Kansas City.   In his rookie year, he played six different positions including designated hitter.  He was also used as a pinch runner numerous times throughout the season.  In his career, Halter played every position for the Royals except catcher.   He bad a .242 batting average with Kansas City.


#282 – Curt Wilkerson (26) – Utility Infield (1992-1993) – 325th Player

MPI Ranking:  422.74

April 8, 1992 – Top of the 6th, Two outs

May 16, 1993 – Bottom of the 7th, One out

He played as a backup second baseman and shortstop for two seasons with Kansas City.  He ended his major league career in Kansas City with a .241 batting average.


#281 – A.J. Hinch (7) – Catcher (2001-2002) – 503rd Player

MPI Ranking:  422.84

April 5, 2001 – Started Game

September 27, 2002 – End of Game

Hinch was a backup catcher during two seasons with Kansas City.  He hit .214 with Kansas City and logged over 900 innings as a catcher.


#280 – Steve Crawford (28) – Middle Relief Pitcher (1989-1991) – 275th Player

MPI Ranking:  423.15

July 5, 1989 – Bottom of the 10th, no outs

October 5, 1991 – End of Game

Crawford played parts of three seasons with Kansas City, pitching out of the bullpen.  His career record with the Royals was 11-7 in 104 relief appearances.  He ended his major league career in Kansas City.


#279 – Harmon Killebrew (3) – Designated Hitter (1975) – 97th Player

MPI Ranking:  423.72

April 7, 1975 – OPENING DAY – Started Game – Top of the 2nd, no outs (DH)

September 26, 1975 – Top of the 9th, Two outs

In 1975, the Kansas City Royals signed Harmon Killebrew to a one-year contract after being released by the Minnesota Twins.  He became the first truly full-time designated hitter in Royals history and appeared as the opening day DH for 1975.  Killebrew only had a .199 batting average and 14 home runs. Killebrew retired after the 1975 season a was elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1984.


#278 – Scott Alexander (54) – Middle Relief Pitcher (2015-2017) – 817th Player

MPI Ranking:  424.68

September 2, 2015 – Top of the 9th, no outs

September 29, 2017 – End of the Top of the 6th

He made his major league debut with Kansas City.  In 2017, he became one of the most reliable pitchers out of the bullpen for the Royals.  His 2.48 ERA was the best among Royals relief pitchers.  He had nine holds during the season and became one of the committee of closers for Kansas City late in the season.  He ended the season with 54 appearances and 59 strikeouts for the Royals.


#277 – Brian Anderson (19) – Starting Pitcher (2003-2005) – 558th Player

MPI Ranking:  426.34

August 26, 2003 – Started Game

May 8, 2005 – End of the Bottom of the 2nd

Anderson was picked to be the opening day starter for the Royals in 2004.  In this, his first full season, he only went 6-12 with a lofty ERA of 5.64.  On May 8, 2005, Anderson tore his elbow ligament, necessitating Tommy John surgery.  He never recovered and his major league career ended.  He went 12-15 over 246 1/3 innings with a 5.44 ERA with the Royals.


#276 – Tim Spehr (12) – Catcher (1991, 1997, 1998-1999) – 311th Player

MPI Ranking:  433.69

July 18, 1991 – Started Game

September 28, 1999 – End of Game

A native of Excelsior Springs, MO, Spehr made his major league debut with Kansas City.  He played primarily as a backup catcher for the Royals.  He played in three different stints with the Royals while playing for other teams during the interim.  He ended his major league career with Kansas City hitting .201 with 14 home runs.


#275 – Hector Ortiz (22) – Catcher (1998-2001) – 454th Player

MPI Ranking:  435.68

September 14, 1998 – Top of the 9th, no outs

October 7, 2001 – End of Game

Ortiz made his major league debut with Kansas City.  He was a backup catcher for the next two season.  Ortiz hit .293 while playing for the Royals.


#274 – Carl Taylor (44) – Catcher (1971, 1972-1973) – 53rd Player

MPI Ranking:  435.69

April 7, 1971 – Top of the 7th, no outs

September 29, 1973 – End of the Bottom of the 6th

Carl Taylor was a backup catcher and utility outfielder in the early 1970s.  He hit .236 for the Royals in 152 appearances. Taylor was also a regular pinch hitter before the designated hitter era.


#273 – Jerry May (12) – Catcher (1971-1973) – 55th Player

MPI Ranking:  437.53

April 9, 1971 – Started Game

May 10, 1973 – End of Game

Jerry May was part of the trade that brought Freddie Patek to Kansas City from Pittsburgh.  May split time with Ed Kirkpatrick behind the plate as catcher.  He hit a career .223 and caught 576 2/3 innings with the Kansas City Royals.


#272 – Chris Young (32) – Middle Relief Pitcher (2015-2017) – 804th Player

MPI Ranking:  441.01

April 12, 2015 – Bottom of the 8th, no outs

June 17, 2017 – End of the Bottom of the 7th

At 6’10”, he is tied with Andy Sisco as the tallest Royals player in history and tied for the second tallest-player in major league history.  In 2015, he became a part of the Royals starting rotation and helped Kansas City win their second World Series title.  Chris Young was 14-15 with the Royals, pitching a 4.76 ERA.


#271 – Christian Colon (24) – Utility Infield (2014-2017) – 788th Player

MPI Ranking:  441.66

July 1, 2014 – Top of the 7th, One out

May 2, 2017 – End of Game

Colon was a utility infielder for parts of four seasons in Kansas City.  He helped the Royals to two playoff berths and their second-ever World Series title.  In both 2014 and 2015, Colon had key moments that helped the Royals come from behind and win a critical game.  Colon hit .263 in 125 games with the Royals.


#270 – Mike Wood (46) – Middle Relief Pitcher (2004-2006) – 585th Player

MPI Ranking:  443.17

June 29, 2004 – Started Game

October 1, 2006 – End of the Bottom of the 5th

Wood split time as a starter and relief pitcher while in Kansas City.  Wood had a career 5.28 ERA with the Royals and a record of 11-19 in 279 2/3 innings pitcher.


#269 – Phil Hiatt (25) – Utility Player (1993-1995) – 345th Player

MPI Ranking:  444.68

April 7, 1993 – Started Game

August 11, 1995 – End of Game

Phil Hiatt made his major league debut with Kansas City.  He played third base in 1993, was in the minors in 1994, and played utility outfield in 1995.  He hit .214 with 14 home runs in Kansas City.


#268 – Steve Braun (3) – Left Field (1978-1980) – 128th Player

MPI Ranking:  445.38

June 2, 1978 – Bottom of the 7th, no outs

June 1, 1980 – End of Game

BRaun began by playing various positions such as left field, third base and pinch hitter.  Braun hit .263 in 1978 and also made two appearances in the 1978 ALCS against the New York Yankees.  He hit a career .246 for the Kansas City Royals.


#267 – Joe Beckwith (27) – Middle Relief Pitcher (1984-1985) – 204th Player

MPI Ranking:  446.45

April 5, 1984 – Top of the 8th, no outs

October 23, 1985 – WORLD SERIES – End of the Bottom of the 7th

He became a major component of the bullpen in 1984 when he pitched 100 2/3 innings of primarily long relief.  In 1985, Beckwith’s record was only 1-5, but his ERA of 4.07 was respectable and he pitched out of the bullpen 95 innings during the season.  He helped the Royals win their first-ever World Series.   He had a career 3.73 ERA with the Royals and had a 9-9 record.   


#266 – Cesar Geronimo (23) – Utility Outfield (1981-1983) – 159th Player

MPI Ranking:  448.83

April 10, 1981 – Bottom of the 8th, no outs

August 28, 1983 – End of Game

He played parts of three seasons with Kansas City.  He was primarily a backup outfielder for Kansas City until his retirement from baseball in 1983.  He het .244 with Kansas City.


#265 – Mendy Lopez (32) – Shortstop (1998-1999, 2003-2004) – 441st Player

MPI Ranking:  452.81

June 3, 1998 – Top of the 9th, no outs

May 27, 2004 – End of Game

He made his major league debut with Kansas City.  He had two stints with Kansas City in the 1990s and 2000s.  Lopez ended his major league career in 2004.  He played a total of 562 2/3 innings at shortstop while in Kansas City.  Lopez hit .246 with the Royals.


#264 – Mike Jones (17) – Middle Relief Pitcher (1980-1985) – 157th Player

MPI Ranking:  459.40

September 6, 1980 – Top of the 6th, No outs

October 6, 1985 – End of the Top of the 2nd

Mike Jones played his entire major league career with the Kansas City Royals.  In December of 1981, Jones suffered a broken neck in a car accident.  He would not pitch again in the major leagues until June of 1984.  During the 1985 season, Jones was primarily a middle relief pitcher, appearing in 33 games with a 3-3 record.  Jones ended his major league career with the Royals in 1985 with an 11-10 record in 71 appearances, pitching 225 1/3 innings, helping the Royals to their second World Series.


#263 – Jerry Adair (14) – Second Base (1969-1970) – 1st Player

MPI Ranking:  460.01

First Game – April 8, 1969 – OPENING DAY – Started Game

Last Game – May 3, 1970 – End of Game

First starting second baseman in Royals history.  Played two seasons with a .244 batting average.  Considered one of the top fielding second basemen in the American League.  Hit the first inside-the-park home run in franchise history


#262 – Lindy McDaniel (41) – Middle Relief Pitcher (1974-1975) – 89th Player

MPI Ranking:  460.19

April 5, 1974 – Top of the 10th, no outs

September 27, 1975 – End of Game

He was primarily a middle relief pitcher in the 1974 season with five spot-starts in late June and early July.  McDaniel pitched again in 1975 with a 4.15 ERA in 78 innings pitched.  He retired from baseball with the Kansas City Royals after pitching in the major leagues since 1955.  He had a 3.75 ERA and a 6-5 record with Kansas City.


#261 – Bill Buckner (14) – Designated Hitter (1988-1989) – 257th Player

MPI Ranking:  461.23

May 14, 1988 – Top of the 9th, no outs (appeared at plate only)

October 1, 1989 – End of Game

Veteran outfielder Bill Buckner signed with the Royals in1988.  Buckner primarily split time as a designated hitter along with George Brett and Pat Tabler.  Buckner hit .239 for the Kansas City Royals in 168 appearances.


#260 – Felipe Paulino (59) – Starting Pitcher (2011-2012) – 737th Player

MPI Ranking:  462.78

May 27, 2011 – Bottom of the 3rd, Two outs

June 6, 2012 – Top of the 1st, Two outs

Paulino pitched for part of two seasons with Kansas City.  He was one of the best pitchers in the American League in 2012 until a season-ending elbow injury.  Paulino was 7-7 with the Royals and had a 3.63 ERA in 28 appearances.


#259 – Brandon Moss (37) – Designated Hitter (2017) – 836th Player

MPI Ranking:  463.18

April 3, 2017 – OPENING DAY – Started Game – Top of the 2nd, 2nd AB (DH)

October 1, 2017 – End of Game

Brandon Moss was the primary designated hitter with Kansas City in 2017, although he did play spot games at first base.  He hit .207 with Kansas City with 22 home runs.


#258 – Storm Davis (43) – Middle Relief Pitcher (1990-1991) – 282nd Player

MPI Ranking:  467.62

April 13, 1990 – Started Game

September 25, 1991 – End of Game

Davis became part of the starting rotation in 1990, starting in 20 games with a 7-10 record.  In 1991, he was changed to a middle relief role, making 51 appearances but only a 3-9 record.  He finished his career with the Royals with a 10-19 record, a 4.85 ERA, and 226 1/3 innings pitched in 72 appearances.  


#257 – Drew Butera (9) – Catcher (2015-2017) – 808th Player

MPI Ranking:  469.25

May 9, 2015 – Started Game

October 1, 2017 – End of Game

Butera was a backup catcher for Salvador Perez for three seasons with Kansas City.  Butera was considered an excellent defensive catcher and versatile player.  He helped the Royals win their second World Series title in 2015.  He hit .239 with the Royals and caught 984 innings.


#256 – Ben Zobrist (18) – Utility Player (2015) – 813th Player

MPI Ranking:  469.48

July 30, 2015 – Started Game

November 1, 2015 – WORLD SERIES – End of Game

Zobrist was acquired by the Royals in 2015 as they pushed towards the playoffs.  He became a utility player until the end of the season, when he moved to second base.  He helped the Royals win their second-ever World Series.  He hit .284 in the regular season with Kansas City.


#255 – Mac Suzuki (17) – Starting Pitcher (1999-2001, 2002) – 466th Player

MPI Ranking:  470.80

June 26, 1999 – Top of the 3rd, no outs

June 28, 2002 – Top of the 5th, One out

Makoto “Mac” Suzuki was the first Japanese player in Royals history.  In 1999, Suzuki split as a starter and middle reliever.  In 2000, Suzuki was added to the starting rotation, recording a 8-10 record with a 4.34 ERA in 29 starts.  Suzuki pitched a total of 333 2/3 innings in his Royals career and had a 12-20 record.  His career ERA was 4.96.


#254 – Dane Iorg (9) – Utility Player (1984-1985) – 209th Player

MPI Ranking:  471.84

May 11, 1984 – Started Game

October 26, 1985 – WORLD SERIES – End of Game

Dane Iorg was a utility player for Kansas City.  He helped the Royals to the playoffs both years in Kansas City.  His most memorable game came during Game 6 of the 1985 World Series.  With two outs in the bottom of the ninth inning and down by one run, Iorg hit a bloop single to right field which scored Onix Concepcion and Jim Sundberg to win the game and force a Game 7 of the World Series.  Dane Iorg became a hero in Kansas City in 1985.  Iorg hit .244 in his Royals career.


#253 – Kurt Bevacqua (2) – Third Base (1973, 1974) – 74th Player

MPI Ranking:  471.90

April 7, 1973 – Started Game – Top of the 3rd, no outs (DH)

October 2, 1974 – End of Game

Bevacqua was a backup third baseman to Paul Schaal in 1973.  In 1974, he was traded to Pittsburgh, but was traded back to Kansas City midseason.  Bevacqua hit .246 with 43 RBIs while with the Royals.


#252 – Ambiorix Burgos (50) – Closing Pitcher (2005-2006) – 604th Player

MPI Ranking:  475.32

April 23, 2005 – Top of the 9th, no outs

September 30, 2006 – Bottom of the 3rd, Two outs

Ambiorix Burgos made his major league debut with the Royals.  He pitched in 63 1/3 innings in 59 appearances and had the fastest average pitch in baseball at 96.5 mph.  Despite only pitching in relief, Burgos was tenth in the league in wild pitches.  In 2006, Burgos was made the team’s closer and led the team with 18 saves, but blew 12 save opportunities.  He ended his career with a 4.81 ERA in 127 appearances for the Royals.


#251 – Scott Service (48) – Middle Relief Pitcher (1997-1999) – 430th Player

MPI Ranking:  476.77

August 30, 1997 – Top of the 9th, no outs

September 26, 1999 – End of Game

In 1998, Service became a major component of the Royals bullpen, pitching in 73 games with a 3.48 ERA and a 6-4 record.  Service fanned 95 strikeouts in 82 2/3 innings.  He continued to be a major part of the bullpen in 1999, pitching 75 1/3  innings in 68 games.  He had a 4.73 ERA with the Royals and a career record of 11-12 over 153 appearances.


#250 – Alex Rios (15) – Right Field (2015) – 799th Player

MPI Ranking:  477.55

April 6, 2015 – OPENING DAY – Started Game

November 1, 2015 – WORLD SERIES – End of the Top of the 7th

He was a veteran outfielder who signed with Kansas City in 2015.  As the primary right fielder, he helped the Royals to their second-ever World Series title.  Rios hit .255 for the Royals before retiring from baseball.


#249 – D.J. Carrasco (59) – Middle Relief Pitcher (2003-2005) – 540th Player

MPI Ranking:  482.99

April 2, 2003 – Top of the 8th, Two outs

September 29, 2005 – Bottom of the 6th, One out

D.J. Carrasco was selected by Kansas City in the 2002 Rule 5 Draft from Pittsburgh and made his major league debut with the Royals.  He split time as a starter and a relief pitcher with Kansas City.  He was 14-15 in his career with the Royals with an ERA of 4.81 in 230 1/3 innings pitched.


#248 – Rob Tejeda (51) – Middle Relief Pitcher (2008-2011) – 678th Player

MPI Ranking:  484.78

June 28, 2008 – Top of the 9th, no outs

May 25, 2011 – End of Game

Rob Tejeda was acquired off waivers from the Texas Rangers in June of 2008.  He made a very positive impact to the bullpen with a 3.20 ERA.  He pitched in 54 relief appearances in 2010 with 56 strikeouts in 61 innings pitched.  He finished his major league career with the Royals pitching in 123 games, a 3.57 ERA and a 9-10 record.


#247 – Todd Benzinger (38) – First Base (1991) – 310th Player

MPI Ranking:  486.16

July 12, 1991 – Started Game

October 6, 1991 – End of Game

Todd Benzinger became the primary first baseman for Kansas City after a mid-season trade to the Royals.  Benzinger hit .294 for the season and hit two home runs.  He played 649 1/3 innings at first base with only three errors.  


#246 – Rudy Law (7) – Utility Outfield (1986) – 223rd Player

MPI Ranking:  490.59

April 9, 1986 – Started Game

October 4, 1986 – Top of the 9th, Two outs

Law played as a backup outfielder in 1986, switching from right to left field.  He hit .261 for the season, but only had 36 RBIs in 307 at bats. Law ended his major league career with the Royals after playing in 87 games.


#245 – Glendon Rusch (53) – Starting Pitcher (1997-1999) – 413th Player

MPI Ranking:  495.66

April 6, 1997 – Started Game

September 8, 1999 – Top of the 5th, One out

He made his major league debut in 1997, when he pitched eight scoreless innings against the Minnesota Twins and he earned his first win.  He finished his Royals career with a 12-25 record in 329 innings pitched with the Royals.  His ERA was 5.80.


#244 – Angel Salazar (2) – Shortstop (1986-1987) – 222nd Player

MPI Ranking:  496.39

April 8, 1986 – OPENING DAY – Started Game

September 27, 1987 – End of Game

When acquired by Kansas City, Salazar had not played in the major leagues since 1984 but was made the opening day shortstop for the Royals due to the departure of Onix Concepcion the previous year.  Salazar only hit .224 for the Royals, yet logged 1,658 2/3 innings at shortstop.


#243 – Joe Zdeb (19) – Left Field (1977-1979) – 115th Player

MPI Ranking:  496.46

April 7, 1977 – OPENING DAY – Started Game

May 29, 1979 – End of Game

Joe Zdeb played his entire career for the Kansas City Royals.  He played mostly in left field, but platooned in right field.  He hit .272 with Kansas City with an appearance in the 1977 ALCS.


#242 – Jason Kendall (18) – Catcher (2010) – 702nd Player

MPI Ranking:  498.76

April 5, 2010 – OPENING DAY – Started Game

August 30, 2010 – End of the Top of the 8th

Veteran catcher Jason Kendall signed as a free agent in 2010.  Kendall is one of only seven catchers with more than 2,000 hits in their career.  He was named the opening day catcher for Kansas City in 2010.  Kendall hit .256 during the season in Kansas City with 37 RBIs.  He lead the American League in throwing out baserunners  attempting to steal with 41 on the season.  


#241 – Buddy Biancalana (1) – Shortstop (1982-1987) – 188th Player

MPI Ranking:  498.93

September 12, 1982 – Top of the 9th, no outs

July 20, 1987 – End of Game

Biancalana made his major league debut with Kansas City.  He played as a backup infielder until the Royals made the playoffs in 1985.  He was then moved to shortstop as a starter and helped the Royals win their first-ever World Series title.  Biancalana hit a career .213 for the Kansas City Royals.


#240 – Johnny Giavotella (9) – Second Base (2011-2014) – 741st Player

MPI Ranking:  498.99

August 5, 2011 – Started Game

September 28, 2014 – End of Game

Giavotella has a career batting average of .238 with the Royals in 125 appearances with the Royals.  Giavotella has an outstanding fielding percentage of .984, but his batting average kept him in the minor leagues for much of his career and only having spot appearances in 2013 and 2014.  


#239 – Louis Coleman (31) – Middle Relief Pitcher (2011-2015) – 732nd Player

MPI Ranking:  506.04

April 21, 2011 – Top of the 7th, no outs

October 2, 2015 – End of the Bottom of the 7th

He made his major league debut with Kansas City.  Coleman had an outstanding season in 2011, pitching a 2.87 ERA.  Coleman made 152 pitching appearances with Kansas City.  He had a 3.20 ERA with a 6-4 record.


#238 – Bob Stinson (15) – Catcher (1975-1976) – 99th Player

MPI Ranking:  507.05

April 14, 1975 – Top of the 9th, no outs

October 12, 1976 – American League Championship Series – End of Game

In his first season, he split time as catcher with Buck Martinez and Fran Healy.  In 1976, he became the full-time backup catcher to Buck Martinez hitting a respectable .263.  He had two brief appearances in the 1976 ALCS against the New York Yankees.  He hit .264 with the Royals.


#237 – Peter Moylan (47) – Middle Relief Pitcher (2016-2017) – 825th Player

MPI Ranking:  508.74

May 15, 2016 – Top of the 4th, no outs

September 30, 2017 – End of the Top of the 7th

Veteran Peter Moylan was a native of Australia and a side-arm pitcher.  Moylan pitched for the Australian National Team before coming to the major leagues in 2006.   In 2017, Moylan led the American League with 79 appearances as a relief pitcher. Moylan had a 3.46 ERA in 104 relief innings with Kansas City.  He also had 31 holds with the Royals.


#236 – Shane Costa (32) – Utility Outfield (2005-2007) – 608th Player

MPI Ranking:  509.16

June 2, 2005 – Started Game

September 30, 2007 – End of Game

Shane Costa was drafted by the Royals in 2003.  His best season was 2006 when he went .274 with three home runs.  By late 2006, he had been moved to a pinch hitter.  He was demoted to AAA Omaha in 2007 and was released from the Royals in 2010.  Costa hit .254 with five home runs in 154 appearances with the Royals.


#235 – Ruben Gotay (30) – Second Base (2004-2005) – 589th Player

MPI Ranking:  512.94

August 3, 2004 – Started Game

August 4, 2005 – End of Game

He made his major league debut with Kansas City..  He hit a respectable .270 in his first season with the Royals.  He was the opening day second baseman in 2005 for the Royals.  During his second season, he played along with a five other players at second base.  Gotay played 1,034 2/3 innings at second base, batting .242.


#234 – David Lough (7) – Right Field (2012-2013) – 758th Player

MPI Ranking:  517.08

September 1, 2012 – SECOND GAME – Started Game

September 29, 2013 – End of Game

Lough played parts of two seasons with Kansas City.  In 2013, he became the everyday right fielder after the release of Jeff Francoeur.  He hit .278  in 96 appearances with Kansas City.


#233 – Ellie Rodriguez (11) – Catcher (1969-1970) – 1st Player

MPI Ranking:  521.11

First Game – April 8, 1969 – OPENING DAY – Started Game

Last Game – October 1, 1970 – End of Game

He was the first catcher in franchise history.  He was also the first player ever to be selected to the All-Star team in 1969, but did not play.  He hit .231 with Kansas City.  Rodriguez was the primary catcher in 1969 and split time with Ed Kirkpatrick in 1970.


#232 – Moe Drabowsky (25) – Closing Pitcher (1969-1970) – 15th Player

MPI Ranking:  524.81

First Game – April 8, 1969 – Top of the 12th, no outs

Last Game – June 14, 1970 – End of Game

As a veteran pitcher, Drabowsky became the first closer in franchise history.  He had 13 saves with Kansas City while pitching a 3.03 ERA.  His career record with the Royals was 12-11.  He is the only Polish-American ever to play for the Royals.


#231 – Mike Jacobs (17) – Designated Hitter (2009) – 684th Player

MPI Ranking:  526.11

April 7, 2009 – OPENING DAY – Started Game  – Top of the 1st, 5th AB

October 4, 2009 – End of Game

Although Jacobs had been a first baseman for the Miami, Kansas City opted to play him at designated hitter for most of the season.  Jacobs proved that he had power, hitting 19 home runs and 61 RBIs, but he also was an extreme strikeout victim with 132.  His batting average was only .228 on the season.  He made 128 appearances with Kansas City.


#230 – Doug Mientkiewicz (11) – First Base (2006) – 615th Player

MPI Ranking:  526.44

April 3, 2006 – OPENING DAY – Started Game

July 25, 2006 – End of the Top of the 7th

He is one of only five players in major league history to win an Olympic Gold Medal (2000 Sydney) and World Series (2004 Boston Red Sox).  He hit .283 for the Royals and was the everyday first baseman until a back injury and surgery ended his season in late July.  Mientkiewicz played 724 2/3 innings at first base in 91 appearances.


#229 – Nelson Briles (19) – Starting Pitcher (1974-1975) – 93rd Player

MPI Ranking:  526.59

April 17, 1974 – Started Game

September 20, 1975 – End of Game

Just after arriving in Kansas City, Briles released a song on Capitol Records titled, “Hey Hank,” asking Hank Aaron not to hit home run #715 off of him.  He was plagued by injuries during his time in Kansas City.  He finished his Royals career with a 4.14 ERA, 114 strikeout in 42 appearances.  His record with the Royals was 11-13 in 215 innings pitched.


#228 – Jorge Bonifacio (38) – Right Field (2017) – 842nd Player

MPI Ranking:  528.21

April 21, 2017 – Started Game

October 1, 2017 – End of Game

His brother, Emilo, played second base for the Royals for a short time in 2013.  He made his major league Kansas City playing right field.  He immediately did very well offensively, hitting 17 home runs during the season. He ended his first season batting .255 with 40 RBIs during the season.


#227 – Jeremy Giambi (15) – Designated Hitter (1998-1999) – 448th Player

MPI Ranking:  528.57

September 1, 1998 – Started Game – Bottom of the 1st, One out (DH)

October 2, 1999 – End of the Bottom of the 8th

Jeremy Giambi, younger brother of Jason Giambi, was drafted by the Royals in 1996.  He hit .275 with Kansas City in parts of two seasons, primarily as a designated hitter.


#226 – Luis Mendoza (39) – Starting Pitcher (2010-2013) – 707th Player

MPI Ranking:  531.34

April 8, 2010 – Top of the 8th, no outs

September 6, 2013 – End of the Top of the 7th

Mendoza made only six appearances between 2010 and 2011.  In 2012, Mendoza became part of the Kansas City starting rotation, starting 25 games in 30 appearances. Mendoza pitched 278 2/3 innings while in Kansas City.  His record was 12-17 with a 4.72 ERA.


#225 – Chris Gwynn (14) – Left Field (1992-1993) – 324th Player

MPI Ranking:  541.50

April 6, 1992 – Top of the 9th, Two outs

October 1, 1993 – End of Game

Chris Gwynn, brother of the late Hall of Famer Tony Gwynn, had played for the 1984 Olympic team that won a silver medal.  Gwynn had limited playing time due to injury in his first season.  By 1993, Gwynn made 103 appearances for Kansas City, playing primarily as a backup to left fielder Kevin McReynolds.  Gwynn hit .300 with 287 at bats.  


#224 – Jeff Conine (19) – Left Field (1990-1992, 1998) – 296th Player

MPI Ranking:  544.76

September 16, 1990 – Bottom of the 7th, no outs

September 27, 1998 – End of Game

Jeff Conine was made his major league debut with the Royals.  He spent a very short period of time between 1990 and 1992 with Kansas City.  He was then selected in the 1992 Expansion Draft by the newly-created Florida Marlins, becoming one of the best hitting outfielders in the National League.  He rejoined the Royals in 1998 for one season.  Conine hit .255 in his time with the Royals and had the nickname of  “Conine the Barbarian.”


#223 – Tim Collins (55) – Middle Relief Pitcher (2011-2014) – 729th Player

MPI Ranking:  545.30

March 31, 2011 – Top of the 9th, no outs

October 28, 2014 – WORLD SERIES – End of Game

Collins stood only 5’7” tall, but pitched a 97 mph four-seam fastball.  He made his major league debut with Kansas City.  In 2013, Collins was a part of the best bullpen in the American League with a 3-6 record and 3.54 ERA.  In 2014, he was included in the 25-man roster for the Royals’ first playoff berth in 29 years.  Collins had 44 holds, 228 appearances, and a 3.54 ERA for Kansas City.


#222 – Sal Fasano (26) – Catcher (1996-1999, 2001) – 396th Player

MPI Ranking:  545.34

April 3, 1996 – Started Game

May 28, 2001 – End of Game

He made his major league debut with the Royals.  In his first two seasons, Fasano played backup catcher or played in the minor leagues.  In 1998, Fasano became a regular member of the Royals, backing up Mike Sweeney in the catcher’s position.  That year, Fasano lead the team and was second in the American League in being hit by a pitches with 16.  Fasano only hit a career .216 with the Royals, but logged 1,242 2/3  innings as a catcher.


#221 – Vida Blue (33) – Starting Pitcher (1982-1983) – 175th Player

MPI Ranking:  556.58

April 11, 1982 – Started Game

July 31, 1983 – SECOND GAME – Bottom of the 5th, no outs

Former American League MVP and Cy Young Award winner Vida Blue became part of the starting rotation of Larry Gura, Paul Splittorff and Dennis Leonard in 1982.  In 1983, he plead guilty, along with Willie Wilson, Willie Aikens and Jerry Martin, for attempting to purchase cocaine and left the Royals.  Vida Blue was 13-17 with a 4.49 ERA as a Kansas City Royals pitcher in 50 appearances.


#220 – Mike Armstrong (31) – Middle Relief Pitcher (1982-1983) – 179th Player

MPI Ranking:  559.34

May 19, 1982 – Top of the 7th, no outs

October 1, 1983 – FIRST GAME – Bottom of the 9th, One out

Armstrong pitched 110 games in middle relief for two seasons, many of which were as a set-up man for closer Dan Quisenberry.  Armstrong’s most memorable game came in 1983 when he was the winning pitcher in the famous “Pine Tar Incident” game.  He was 15-12 with a 3.51 ERA in Kansas City.


#219 – Steve Hovley (30) – Utility Outfield (1972-1973) – 63rd Player

MPI Ranking:  560.68

April 15, 1972 – OPENING DAY – Started Game

September 28, 1973 – End of Game

Steve Hovley was acquired in the Rule 5 Draft from the Oakland Athletics in late 1971.  In his two seasons with the Royals, he played as a backup outfielder, primarily left field and center field.  He also was called upon to pinch hit or pinch run many times.  Hovley’s career average was .262.  Hovley ended his major league career with the Royals in 1973 having played 209 games.


#218 – Reggie Sanders (16) – Right Field (2006-2007) – 615th Player

MPI Ranking:  567.79

April 3, 2006 – OPENING DAY – Started Game

July 29, 2007 – End of the Bottom of the 8th

Veteran outfielder Reggie Sanders signed with the Kansas City Royals in 2006.  Sanders shared time in right field with Emil Brown, logging 601 innings in that position.  On June 10, 2006, Sanders hit the 300th home run of his career against the Tampa Bay Devil Rays, becoming only the fifth player in baseball history with over 300 home runs and 300 stolen bases.  He hit .259 with the Kansas City Royals.


#217 – Bob Johnson (30) – Starting Pitcher (1970) – 41st Player

MPI Ranking:  568.09

First Game – April 10, 1970 – Top of the 5th, no outs

Last Game – October 1, 1970 – End of Game

Johnson pitched for only one season with Kansas City and had only an 8-13 record.  However, he had 206 strikeouts and a 3.07 ERA, third-best in the American League.  He was ranked the top fielding pitcher in the American League.  He was a part of the trade that brought Freddie Patek to Kansas City from Pittsburgh.


#216 – Ervin Santana (54) – Starting Pitcher (2013) – 762nd Player

MPI Ranking:  570.43

April 3, 2013 – Started Game

September 25, 2013 – Bottom of the 7th, no outs

Santana became part of a one-two punch in the starting rotation along with recently acquired James Shields.  Unfortunately for Santana, he had the worst run support of any starting pitcher in the American League.  He had a 9-10 record with the Royals with a 3.24 ERA and 161 strikeouts in 211 innings pitched.  


#215 – Floyd Bannister (19) – Starting Pitcher (1988-1989) – 256th Player

MPI Ranking:  570.69

April 8, 1988 – Started Game

June 11, 1989 – End of the Top of the 3rd

Bannister, a veteran and former all-star pitcher, was inserted into the starting rotation for the Royals in 1988.  He was a part of an impressive starting rotation of Bret Saberhagen, Charlie Leibrandt and Mark Gubicza.  He was 16-14 with a 4.42 ERA in Kansas City.


#214 – Larry Sutton (22) – Utility Outfield (1997-1999) – 429th Player

MPI Ranking:  572.40

August 17, 1997 – Started Game

October 2, 1999 – Bottom of the 9th, no outs

Larry Sutton made his major league debut with Kansas City.  In 1998, Sutton was picked to be the right fielder on opening day for the Royals.  Sutton was a career .247 hitter over 181 games for the Royals.


#213 – Gerald Perry (17) – Designated Hitter (1990) – 279th Player

MPI Ranking:  572.76

April 9, 1990 – OPENING DAY – Started Game – Bottom of the 1st, no outs (DH)

October 3, 1990 – End of Game

Perry split time with the Royals between first base and designated hitter in 1990.  He hit .254 for the season with eight home runs.  He split time at first base with George Brett and he platooned at DH with Brett and Danny Tartabull.  Perry made 513 plate appearances over 133 games with Kansas City.


#212 – Terrence Long (3) – Left Field (2005) – 597th Player

MPI Ranking:  575.12

April 4, 2005 – OPENING DAY – Started Game

October 1, 2005 – End of Game

He was the opening day left fielder for the Royals in 2005.  He hit .279 for the season with six home runs.  Long played 794 innings that season for the Kansas City Royals over 137 games.


#211 – Bob Boone (8) – Catcher (1989-1990) – 269th Player

MPI Ranking:  578.28

April 3, 1989 – OPENING DAY – Started Game

September 27, 1990 – End of the Bottom of the 8th

Former all-star veteran catcher Bob Boone signed with the Kansas City Royals in 1988.  Boone was the Royals’ opening day catcher and primary catcher for the season.  He had a respectable .274 batting average for the season.  Boone led the American League in games as a catcher that season.  He was also first in the league in putouts by a catcher, second in assists, first in pickoffs.  His defensive prowess earned him his seventh Gold Glove award as a catcher.  He became the first Royals catcher ever to earn such an honor.  He appeared as catcher in 1,417 innings and hit a .266 batting average.


#210 – Jason Grimsley (38) – Middle Relief Pitcher (2001-2004) – 501st Player

MPI Ranking:  580.24

April 4, 2001 – Bottom of the 7th, no outs

June 19, 2004 – End of Game

Grimsley’s 2001 season was the best of his career, posting a 3.01 ERA with 61 strikeouts in 73 appearances.  He became the setup pitcher for closer Roberto Hernandez.  He would pitch in 70 plus games each of the next two season for the Royals..  He is the second all-time holds leader for the Royals with 72 during his career in Kansas City.  He finished his Royals career with a 3.94 ERA, 196 strikeouts in 251 relief appearances.  Grimsley became one of the greatest setup pitchers in Royals history.


#209 – Mike Boddicker (52) – Starting Pitcher (1991-1992) – 301st Player

MPI Ranking:  580.26

April 9, 1991 – Started Game

September 3, 1992 – Top of the 6th, One out

He was a part of the starting rotation of 1991 along with Kevin Appier, Bret Saberhagen and Mark Gubicza.  He had a 12-12 record in his first season with the Royals, pitching a 4.08 ERA with 79 strikeouts.  After two season, Boddicker finished his Royals career 13-16 in 59 appearances with a 4.38 ERA in 267 1/3 innings pitched.


#208 – Blake Stein (34) – Starting Pitcher (1999-2002) – 470th Player

MPI Ranking:  583.75

August 1, 1999 – Bottom of the 3rd, no outs

September 8, 2002 – Top of the 11th, Two outs

Stein was immediately made a part of the starting rotation upon his arrival in Kansas City.  On June 17, 2001 against the Milwaukee Brewers, Stein tied an American League record held by Nolan Ryan with eight consecutive strikeouts. He had a 5.01 career ERA with the Royals and a record of 16-19 in 355 2/3 career innings pitched.


#207 – Ken Wright (28) – Middle Relief Pitcher (1970-1973) – 43rd Player

MPI Ranking:  585.22

April 10, 1970 – Top of the 6th, no outs

September 10, 1973 – Bottom of the 7th, One out

Wright pitched primarily in relief, but did have 12 starts in two different season.  He was 11-15 and had a 4.57 ERA with Kansas City.  He bounced back and forth from AAA Omaha to Kansas City.  He made 24 starts in all with Kansas City.,


#206 – Ryan Shealy (43) – First Base (2006-2008) – 636th Player

MPI Ranking:  592.27

August 1, 2006 – Started Game

September 28, 2008 – End of the Bottom of the 3rd

He replaced first baseman Doug Mientkiewicz after he had a season-ending injury at first base.  Shealy made an immediate impact, hitting .280 with seven home runs.  He was the opening day first baseman in 2007.  He hit .260 with the Royals in 123 games and logged 1,043 innings at first base.


#205 – Scott Podsednik (22) – Left Field (2010) – 702nd Player

MPI Ranking:  594.26

April 5, 2010 – OPENING DAY – Started Game

July 28, 2010 – End of Game

Podsednik became the starting left fielder for the Kansas City Royals in 2010.  He had a .310 batting average with 30 stolen bases and five home runs.  The Royals, however, decided to trade Podsednik in late July to the Los Angeles Dodgers.


#204 – Mike Fiore (19) – First Base (1969-1970) – 21st Player

MPI Ranking:  596.91

First Game – April 9, 1969 – Bottom of the 12th, Two outs

Last Game – May 23, 1970 – End of the Top of the 5th

Fiore was the primary first baseman for the Royals during their first season in Kansas City.  He was the first player in franchise history to hit a home run in 1969.  He had a career .258 batting average while in Kansas City.


#203 – Gregg Zaun (44) – Catcher (2000-2001) – 477th Player

MPI Ranking:  599.69

April 3, 2000 – OPENING DAY – Started Game

October 6, 2001 – SECOND GAME – End of Game

Zaun hit .274 in his one season with the Royals, with seven home runs in 83 appearances.  Due to injuries, he only played 39 games in 2001.  Zaun hit .290 in his time with the Royals.


#202 – Mike Magnante (57) – Middle Relief Pitcher (1991-1996) – 305th Player

MPI Ranking:  601.93

April 22, 1991 – Top of the 6th, no outs

September 21, 1996 – End of Game

He made his major league debut with the Royals.  A left-handed pitcher, Magnante appeared in 191 games with the Royals, mostly in relief and had a career ERA of 4.40.  He is also credited with having 22 holds in Royals history.  He pitched a total of 325 1/3 innings and a 10-18 record with the Royals.


#201 – Renie Martin (27) – Middle Relief Pitcher (1979-1981) – 137th Player

MPI Ranking:  602.05

May 9, 1979 – Bottom of the 8th, Two outs

October 9, 1981 – American League Division Series – End of Game

Martin split time as a starter and relief pitcher in his three seasons with Kansas City.  He helped the Royals to their first-ever World Series in 1980.  Martin finished his Royals career with a 4.08 ERA in 233 2/3 innings.


#200 – Hal Morris (23) – Utility Player (1998) – 434th Player

MPI Ranking:  603.32

March 31, 1998 – OPENING DAY – Started Game – Top of the 1st, 1st AB

September 27, 1998 – End of the Top of the 7th

He played left field on opening day in 1998, but split his time almost evenly between first base, left field and designated hitter throughout the season.  He hit .309 over 521 plate appearances for the season, but only had one home run and 40 RBIs.  


#199 – Jackie Hernandez (24) – Shortstop (1969-1970) – 1st Player

MPI Ranking:  604.07

First Game – April 8, 1969 – OPENING DAY – Started Game

Last Game – September 29, 1970 – Top of the 9th, One out

He was the first shortstop in franchise history.  He started at the position for two seasons with Kansas City.  He hit .222 with Kansas City.  After the 1970 season, he was a part of the trade that brought Freddie Patek to Kansas City from Pittsburgh.


#198 – Dan Reichert (41) – Middle Relief Pitcher (1999-2002) – 468th Player

MPI Ranking:  610.82

July 16, 1999 – SECOND GAME – Started Game

July 15, 2002 – FIRST GAME – End of the Top of the 8th

He made his major league debut with Kansas City.  During his three seasons in Kansas City, Stein split his time as a starter and relief pitcher.  He ended his Royals career with a 5.53 ERA in 379 innings pitched and a 21-25 record.


#197 – Jim Colborn (48) – Starting Pitcher (1977-1978) – 119th Player

MPI Ranking:  611.04

April 10, 1977 – Started Game

May 24, 1978 – Bottom of the 8th, Two outs

In 1977, Jim Colborn became part of the starting rotation alongside Dennis Leonard, Paul Splittorff and Andy Hassler.  Colborn had a 3.62 ERA with 103 strikeouts over 239 innings pitched.  His record of 18-14 was second only to Leonard.  On May 14, 1977, Colborn became the first Royals pitcher to pitch a no-hitter in Royals Stadium against the Texas Rangers.  He was also known as one of the best fielding pitchers in baseball.  He pitched .374 with Kansas City and a 19-16 record in Kansas City.


#196 – Neifi Perez (8) – Shortstop (2001-2002) – 510th Player

MPI Ranking:  611.72

July 25, 2001 – Started Game

September 27, 2002 – End of Game

Neifi Perez was involved in one of the most hated trades in Royals history.  He was traded by the Colorado Rockies for all-star Jermaine Dye.  At the same time, star shortstop Rey Sanchez was traded to the Atlanta Braves, making room for Perez.  He also had a strained relationship with manager Tony Pena.  He even refused to play in a late-season game despite being requested to by the manager.  Perez played 1,605 1/3 innings at shortstop over 194 games.  He hit .238 with Kansas City.


#195 – Tony Pena, Jr. (1) – Shortstop (2007-2009) – 645th Player

MPI Ranking:  612.03

April 2, 2007 – OPENING DAY – Started Game

July 12, 2009 – End of Game

Tony Pena, Jr. was the son of catcher-great and former Royals Manager Tony Pena, Sr.  On Opening Day of 2007, Pena hit two triples in a 7-1 victory over the Boston Red Sox.  He became only the sixth player in major league history to accomplish this feat on opening day.  He had a .228 career batting average for the Royals and played 2,031 2/3 innings at shortstop with over 287 games.


#194 – Nori Aoki (23) – Right Field (2014) – 777th Player

MPI Ranking:  620.13

March 31, 2014 – OPENING DAY – Started Game

October 29, 2014 – WORLD SERIES – End of Game

Norichika Aoki was known for his unorthodox style of slap-hitting and was a successful lead-off runner for the Royals.  Aoki was an excellent fielder who won two Gold Gloves in Japan.  From May 10 to the end of the season, Aoki set a club record for the most innings, 673, without an error in the outfield.  Aoki helped the Royals make their first playoff appearance in 29 years.  He hit .285 with 17 stolen bases in his only season with Kansas City.


#193 – Keith Miller (16) – Second Base (1992-1995) – 323rd Player

MPI Ranking:  622.12

April 6, 1992 – OPENING DAY – Started Game – Top of the 1st, Two outs

May 13, 1995 – End of Game

The trade for Keith Miller outraged many Royals fans because they did not want to see the departure of Saberhagen from Kansas City.  He became the everyday second baseman.  His offense was quite an improvement, hitting .284 with four home runs and 16 stolen bases.  He earned the name “pigpen” by his teammates for his hustle on the field.  He hit .258 with the Royals.


#192 – Greg Pryor (4) – Third Base (1982-1986) – 177th Player

MPI Ranking:  623.22

April 17, 1982 – Top of the 8th, no outs

September 30, 1986 – End of Game

Pryor was a utility infielder for much of his time in Kansas City.  He became the primary third baseman for Kansas City in 1984 due to an injury to George Brett that kept him out of most of the season.  Pryor helped the Royals win their first-ever World Series title in 1985.  He hit .237 and in 10th all-time in innings played at third base.


#191 – Kirk Gibson (30) – Left Field (1991) – 300th Player

MPI Ranking:  624.93

April 8, 1991 – OPENING DAY – Started Game – Bottom of the 2nd, no outs (DH)

October 2, 1991 – Bottom of the 4th, Two outs

Veteran Kirk Gibson was the opening day designated hitter for Kansas City in 1991.  Despite only hitting .236, Gibson hit 16 home runs, had 18 stolen bases and 55 RBIs.  Most of the time, he played in left field.  He hit .236 with Kansas City.


#190 – Jon Nunnally (22) – Right Field (1995-1997) – 364th Player

MPI Ranking:  626.97

April 26, 1995 – Bottom of the 8th, One out

July 13, 1997 – End of Game

Jon Nunnally was selected in the Rule 5 Draft by the Kansas City Royals.  Nunnally hit .244 in his first season with the Royals with 14 home runs.  In his first major league at bat on April 29, 1995 against the Yankees, Nunnally became only the 70th player to hit a homerun in his first major league at bat, accomplishing it in the leadoff spot in the bottom of the first inning.  He also set the club record with four times stealing home plate in 1995.  He finished his Royals career with a .237 batting average and 20 home runs in 167 games played.


#189 – Rusty Meacham (27) – Middle Relief Pitcher (1992-1995) – 328th Player

MPI Ranking:  630.15

April 15, 1992 – Top of the 8th, no outs

October 1, 1995 – End of the Bottom of the 7th

In his first season with the Royals, Meacham pitched fantastic from the bullpen with a 2.74 ERA in 101 2/3  innings and a record of 10-4 in 64 appearances.  He continued the tradition started by Dan Quisenberry of spraying down the right field fans with the bullpen hose.  His career record was 19-12.  He had a 3.79 ERA, eight saves and 28 holds in 164 relief appearances in his career with the Royals.


#188 – Dave McCarty (6) – First Base (2000-2002) – 481st Player

MPI Ranking:  631.98

April 5, 2000 – Bottom of the 8th, no outs

May 10, 2002 – End of Game

His first season with the Kansas City Royals, McCarty played a career-high 103 games, primarily as a first baseman or pinch hitter.  He hit .278 with 12 home runs.  In 2001, McCarty became a backup to Mike Sweeney at first base, hitting a .250 batting average with seven home runs.  He was a career .255 hitter over 214 games played with the Royals.


#187 – Gail Hopkins (18) – First Base (1971-1973) – 54th Player

MPI Ranking:  935.92

April 7, 1971 – Top of the 9th, Two outs

September 28, 1973 – End of Game

Hopkins split time at first base while with the Royals and was also a frequent pinch hitter before the designated hitter era.  He had a .260 batting average with Kansas City.


#186 – Joe Vitiello (32) – Designated Hitter (1995-1999) – 367th Player

MPI Ranking:  637.40

April 29, 1995 – Bottom of the 7th, One out

September 25, 1999 – End of the Bottom of the 7th

He made his major league debut with Kansas City.  Between 1995 and 1996, Vitiello split his time in Kansas City and AAA Omaha, despite being the opening day designated hitter.  During those two seasons, he only batted .245.  In 1996, he again was on the opening day roster, but the Royals decided to give him more fielding duties as an outfielder. Vitiello had 440 plate appearances as a designated hitter in 205 games played.  He batted .235 with 21 home runs.


#185 – Luis Alicea (12) – Second Base (2001-2002) – 500th Player

MPI Ranking:  640.41

April 2, 2001 – Top of the 9th, Two outs – 7th AB

September 25, 2002 – Bottom of the 8th, One out

As a veteran, Alicea primarily played second base and third base.  He received a lot of playing time in 2001 at second base for the injured Carlos Febles, logging over 500 innings in the position.  Alicea retired after the 2002 season having played in 99 career games at second base with the Royals.  He had a .256 batting average with Kansas City.


#184 – Jerry Martin (25) – Right Field (1982-1983) – 171st Player

MPI Ranking:  649.98

April 5, 1982 – OPENING DAY – Started Game

April 24, 1983 – End of the Top of the 5th

He became the Royals everyday right fielder in 1982, hitting 15 home runs for Kansas City.  Martin, along with Willie Aikens, Willie Wilson and Vida Blue became the first major league players to go to prison during their careers due to cocaine.  He played 1,240 innings in right field and hit .270 for Kansas City.


#183 – Willie Bloomquist (8) – Utility Player (2009-2010) – 687th Player

MPI Ranking:  654.90

April 8, 2009 – Bottom of the 8th, no outs

September 12, 2010 – End of Game

Bloomquist played most of the season in the outfield, but he also played shortstop and second base.  Bloomquist demonstrated very well that he could play any position with Kansas City, playing every fielding position except pitcher and catcher.  He played in 197 games for Kansas City, hitting .265 with 33 stolen bases.


#182 – Richie Scheinblum (5) – Right Field (1972, 1974) – 66th Player

MPI Ranking:  661.43

April 19, 1972 – SECOND GAME – Top of the 9th, no outs

August 3, 1974 – End of Game

Scheinblum had a meteoric beginning in Kansas City in 1972 when he was hitting .331 by midseason.  He was picked to play in the All-Star Game that season.  He was also famous that season for wearing a black armband in remembrance of the Israeli Olympics killed at the Munich Olympics.  He was part of the trade to the Cincinnati Reds that brought Hal McRae to Kansas City.  Scheinblum briefly came back to the Royals in 1974.  He hit .281 with Kansas City and was the last player to wear the Number 5 before George Brett came to the Royals.


#181 – Gary Thurman (25) – Utility Outfield (1987-1992) – 250th Player

MPI Ranking:  668.84

August 30, 1987 – Started Game

October 2, 1992 – End of the Top of the 6th

Thurman made his major league debut with Kansas City.  He played parts of six seasons with Kansas City and was considered an excellent pinch runner.  Thurman hit .245 in 325 appearances with the Kansas City Royals.


#180 – Cheslor Cuthbert (19) – Third Base (2015-2017) – 811th Player

MPI Ranking:  672.64

July 7, 2015 – FIRST GAME – Started Game

October 1, 2017 – End of Game

He is from a Corn Island, a small island off the coast of Nicaragua.  He made his major league with Kansas City in 2015.  Due to a season-ending injury to Mike Moustakas, Cuthbert became the everyday third baseman for the Royals in 2016.  In his Royals career, he is a .261 hitter.


#179 – Jose Lind (13) – Second Base (1993-1995) – 342nd Player

MPI Ranking:  678.95

April 5, 1993 – OPENING DAY – Started Game

May 31, 1995 – End of Game

Lind was the cousin of former Kansas City shortstop Onix Concepcion.  Lind would become the starting second baseman for the Royals over the next three seasons.  He was sometimes known as “Chico” Lind because of his playful behavior.  He was now considered one of the top defensive second basemen of the American League.  He abruptly left the Royals in 1995 due to personal problems.  Lind played 2,141 2/3 at second base.  Jose Lind’s career batting average with the Kansas City was .258.


#178 – Joe Foy (22) – Third Base (1969) – 1st Player

MPI Ranking:  679.04

First Game – April 8, 1969 – OPENING DAY – Started Game

Last Game – September 27, 1969 – End of Game

First starting third baseman in Royals history.  Foy was also known to play in any position except catcher and pitcher.  He had 37 stolen bases in 1969, fifth in the American League.  He would end up being traded to the New York Mets for Amos Otis and Bob Johnson.


#177 – Brayan Pena (27) – Catcher (2009-2012) – 690th Player

MPI Ranking:  679.99

April 11, 2009 – Top of the 9th, no outs

October 3, 2012 – End of Game

He was the primary backup catcher for both Miguel Olivo, Jason Kendall, Matt Treanor and Salvador Perez.  Pena hit .251 with the Kansas City Royals in 1,505 2/3 innings at catcher.


#176 – Terry Shumpert (3) – Second Base (1990-1994) – 285th Player

MPI Ranking:  685.55

May 1, 1990 – Started Game

August 9, 1994 – End of Game

Terry Shumpert became the replacement second baseman for the retiring Frank White.  He was a career .220 hitter for the Royals and played 1,894 innings at second base.


#175 – Wilson Betemit (46) – Third Base (2010-2011) – 712th Player

MPI Ranking:  691.19

May 25, 2010 – Top of the 9th, One out

July 17, 2011 – End of Game

Betemit took over the day-to-day third base duties after Alberto Callaspo was traded.  On June 10, 2010, Betemit hit two home runs on both sides of the plate against the Minnesota Twins, becoming only the fifth player in franchise history to accomplish the feat.  Betemit continued his success in 2011 at third base until he was traded in late July.  Betemit hit .290 while in Kansas City, hitting 16 home runs in 141 appearances.


#174 – Vada Pinson (28) – Right Field (1974-1975) – 87th Player

MPI Ranking:  693.41

April 5, 1974 – OPENING DAY – Started Game

September 28, 1975 – Top of the 6th, One out

In 1974, Pinson split time in right field with rookie Al Cowens.  Pinson hit .276 with six home runs in his first season with the Royals.  Despite being on the opening day roster in 1975, Pinson played the season as a backup outfielder, again splitting the backup duties with Al Cowens.  Pinson was a .252 career hitter while logging 1,153 2/3 innings in right field with the Royals.


#173 – Gregg Jefferies (9) – Third Base (1992) – 320th Player

MPI Ranking:  693.77

April 6, 1992 – OPENING DAY – Started Game – Top of the 1st, 2nd AB

October 4, 1992 – End of Game

The trade for Gregg Jefferies outraged many Royals fans because they did not want to see the departure of Saberhagen from Kansas City.  He became the everyday third baseman for the Kansas City Royals, hitting .285 with 10 home runs and 75 RBIs.  Jefferies played 1,288 1/3 innings at third base during the season.


#172 – Gene Garber (32) – Closing Pitcher (1973-1974, 1987-1988) – 76th Player

MPI Ranking:  696.00

April 11, 1973 – Top of the 4th, One out

July 1, 1988 – Top of the 8th, Two outs

Garber had two stints with Kansas City his his Royals career.  In the early 1970s, Garber was a submarine pitcher as a setup pitcher for Doug Bird.  He was traded to Philadelphia and returned to the Royals 13 years later.  He became a rotating closer in the late 1980s with Dan Quisenberry.  Garber had 26 saves with the Royals and 4.11 ERA.  His career record with Kansas City was 10-15.


#171 – Ian Kennedy (31) – Starting Pitcher (2016-2017) – 821st Player

MPI Ranking:  698.59

April 9, 2016 – Started Game

September 29, 2017 – End of the Top of the 5th

In 2016, he signed for $70 million for five years, the largest pitching contract in franchise history.  Kennedy became the workhorse of the Royals in 2016, pitching 195 2/3 innings in 33 starts.   Kennedy is 16-24 with a 4.43 ERA in Kansas City over two seasons.


#170 – Tony Solaita (8) – First Base (1974-1976) – 90th Player

MPI Ranking:  703.22

April 5, 1974 – Bottom of the 11th, Two outs

July 11, 1976 – End of the Top of 6th

Tony Solaita was selected in the Rule 5 Draft in 1973 from the Pittsburgh Pirates.  He became the first player in the major leagues from the American Samoa.  Solaita was a backup first baseman to John Mayberry and played some time at designated hitter.  On July 18, 1974, Solaita hit a 550 foot home run at Yankee Stadium, into the wind, that was said to be one of the longest in Yankee Stadium history.  He was one of the strongest hitters in Royals history.  While in Kansas City, Solaita hit .260 with 23 home runs in 220 games.    


#169 – Paul Byrd (36) – Starting Pitcher (2001-2002) – 507th Player

MPI Ranking:  707.07

June 8, 2001 – Started Game

September 25, 2002 – Top of the 7th, Two outs

Byrd was traded to the Royals midseason and instantly had positive results.  In 2002, Byrd had a masterful season with a 17-11 record despite the Royals having a 100 loss season.  He was ranked one of the top ten pitchers in the major leagues.  He led the American League with seven complete games.  He also established a club record 28 1/3 straight innings without giving up a walk in the beginning of a season.  He had a 3.95 career ERA with the Royals in 48 games started.  His record was 23-17.


#168 – Aaron Crow (43) – Middle Relief Pitcher (2011-2014) – 727th Player

MPI Ranking:  710.36

March 31, 2011 – Top of the 6th, Two outs

September 28, 2014 – End of the Bottom of the 6th

Crow made his major league debut with Kansas City.  He was named to the All-Star Game in 2011 as a rookie, but did not pitch. In 2013, he was a part of the best bullpen in the American League with a 44 strikeouts in 48 innings pitched.  His career record with the Royals in 20-11 with six saves and 57 holds.  He is third all-time in holds for the Royals behind Kelvin Herrera and Jason Grimsley.


#167 – Joe Keough (16) – Right Field (1969-1972) – 16th Player

MPI Ranking:  712.00

First Game – April 8, 1969 – Bottom of the 12th, One out

Last Game – October 4, 1972 – End of Game

He was the first Royals player to have a game-winning RBI in the first game of the 1969 inaugural season for Kansas City.  He was plagued with injuries for much of his career in Kansas City, primarily playing outfield.  He batted .250 with Kansas City.


#166 – Dee Brown (27) – Left Field (1998-2004) – 452nd Player

MPI Ranking:  714.279

September 14, 1998 – Bottom of the 8th, no outs

October 3, 2004 – End of Game

He made his major league debut with Kansas City.  Between 1998 and 2000, Brown only played 32 games in Kansas City, but in 2001, Brown was selected as designated hitter on opening day.  For the first half of 2001, Brown split time between designated hitter and left field before permanently playing left field halfway through the season. Brown hit .234 for the Royals in his career with 14 home runs and 1,321 2/3  innings played in left field.


#165 – Jimmy Gobble (41) – Middle Relief Pitcher (2003-2008) – 556th Player

MPI Ranking:  714.280

August 3, 2003 – Started Game

September 28, 2003 – End of Game

He earned a spot on the starting rotation in 2004.  He started 24 games with a 9-8 record that season, but only had an ERA of 5.35.  He split time with Kansas City and AAA Omaha in 2005 before coming back as a full-time relief pitcher in 2006.  His best season was in 2007 when he led the Royals with 74 appearances.  Unfortunately, he set the franchise record with the most earned runs given up by a relief pitcher with 10 in one inning in July of 2008.  His career record was 22-23 with an ERA of 5.23 in 235 appearances.


#164 – Craig Paquette (12) – Third Base (1996-1997) – 399th Player

MPI Ranking:  715.16

April 28, 1996 – Started Game

July 20, 1997 – End of the Bottom of the 7th

The 1996 season became the best season of his career as Paquette made 118 appearances as a utility player, mostly playing third base, first base and outfielder.  Paquette showed power by hitting 22 home runs in his first season.  However, he led the team in strikeouts with 101 on the season.  Paquette only hit a career .248 in 195 appearances with the Royals.


#163 – Jim Sundberg (8) – Catcher (1985-1986) – 215th Player

MPI Ranking:  716.39

April 8, 1985 – OPENING DAY – Started Game

October 5, 1986 – End of the Top of the 8th

Veteran catcher Jim Sundberg was acquired by the Kansas City Royals in 1985.  Sundberg was one of the best fielding catchers in the American League, despite the fact that he was clearly in the twilight years of his career.   He helped the Royals won their first-ever World Series.  He hit .227 in his time with Kansas City.


#162 – Runelvys Hernandez (40) – Starting Pitcher (2002-2006) – 531st Player

MPI Ranking:  722.03

July 15, 2002 – SECOND GAME – Started Game

September 29, 2006 – Bottom of the 6th, One out

Runelvys Hernandez made his major league debut with Kansas City.  By the following season, he was the Opening Day starter.  He missed the entire 2004 season due to Tommy John surgery.  He was known as a pitcher with a fiery temper, even getting into fights with his own teammates.  He had a 25-33 record with the Royals in 78 starts with a 5.38 ERA.


#161 – Andy Hassler (16) – Starting Pitcher (1976-1978) – 109th Player

MPI Ranking:  731.13

July 7, 1976 – Started Game

July 13, 1978 – End of the Bottom of the 7th

Hassler was a part of the starting rotation for the Royals for parts of three seasons.  He helped the Royals to their first-ever playoff berth in 1976.  He finished his Royals career with a 3.81 ERA.  His overall record in Kansas City was 15-16 in 50 starts during 314 1/3 innings pitched.


#160 – Al Hrabosky (39) – Closing Pitcher (1978-1979) – 126th Player

MPI Ranking:  735.89

April 9, 1978 – Bottom of the 8th, One out

September 23, 1979 – Bottom of the 9th, Two outs

Known as “The Mad Hungarian,” Al Hrabosky was traded to the Kansas City Royals from the St. Louis Cardinals.  He earned his nickname due to his unusual pitching routine of vigorously pounding the ball into his glove while walking toward second base and taking deep breaths in between each pitch.  In addition, he was known for his bad temper and his menacing fu manchu.  Hrabosky had a 17-11 record with the Royals with 31 saves over two seasons.


#159 – Ross Gload (7) – First Base (2007-2008) – 645th Player

MPI Ranking:  740.66

April 2, 2007 – OPENING DAY – Started Game

September 18, 2008 – End of Game

Gload split time at first base with Billy Butler and Ryan Shealy.  Gload hit .280  and logged 1,554 innings at first base with the Kansas City Royals.  He also had 88 RBIs with the Royals.


#158 – Chili Davis (44) – Designated Hitter (1997) – 415th Player

MPI Ranking:  742.83

April 14, 1997 – Started Game – Top of the 2nd, no outs (DH)

September 23, 1997 – FIRST GAME – End of Game

Thomas “Chili” Davis was the first Jamaican to play major league baseball and played just one season in Kansas City.  With the Royals, he hit a career high 30 home runs while batting .279.  On June 7, Davis became only the third player in franchise history to hit two home runs in the same game from both sides of the plate against the Texas Rangers.  Chili Davis’ season was one of the most productive by a designated hitter in Royals’ history.  


#157 – Buck Martinez (21) – Catcher (1969-1977) – 30th Player

MPI Ranking:  757.22

First Game – June 18, 1969 – FIRST GAME – Bottom of the 9th, Two outs

Last Game – October 1, 1977 – End of Game

Martinez spent much of his first five seasons bouncing back and forth from the minor leagues and Kansas City.  he became the a full-time backup catcher in 1975 for the Royals.  In 1976, he helped the Royals to their first-ever playoff berth and was the Royals catcher for all five games of the ALCS in 1976.  He hit .222 with Kansas City.


#156 – Miguel Olivo (21) – Catcher (2008-2009) – 669th Player

MPI Ranking:  759.44

April 5, 2008 – Started Game

October 3, 2009 – End of Game

Olivo started as the backup catcher to John Buck.  By  2009, Olivo replaced Buck as the primary catcher for the Royals.  Olivo showed a lot of power at the plate, hitting .249 with a team-leading 23 home runs.  Olivo was a .251 hitter with 35 home runs in his brief career with the Royals.  He logged 1,340 innings as catcher.


#155 – Joey Gathright (2) – Center Field (2006-2008) – 634th Player

MPI Ranking:  761.10

June 21, 2006 – Started Game

September 27, 2008 – End of Game

Joey Gathright was one of the best stolen base players on the Royals during his tenure with Kansas City.  He played primarily in center field, but saw a lot of time in left field.  He hit .273 with the Royals with 40 stolen bases over 2 1/2  seasons.  He played 1,354 2/3 innings in center field.  


#154 – Darrell May (34) – Starting Pitcher (2002-2004) – 522nd Player

MPI Ranking:  770.31

April 13, 2002 – Started Game

September 28, 2004 – End of the Top of the 6th

Darrell May signed as a free agent for the Kansas City Royals after playing four years in Japan.  Despite struggling in his first season, May became one of the top ten pitchers in the American League in 2003.   May had a 23-37 record with Kansas City and a career era of 4.81 in 527 1/3 innings pitched.


#153 – Paulo Orlando (16) – Utility Outfield (2015-2017) – 802nd Player

MPI Ranking:  773.24

April 9, 2015 – Started Game

October 1, 2017 – End of Game

Orlando was a track star in his home country of Brazil before becoming a baseball player.  He made his major league debut with the Royals after nine years in the minor leagues.  He is the third-ever Brazilian in major league history.  He is the first player in major league history to hit three triples as his first three hits.  He helped the Royals to their second-ever World Series title in 2015.  Orlando hit .274 with the Kansas City Royals during his three seasons.


#152 – Tony Graffanino (14) – Utility Infield (2004-2005, 2006) – 565th Player

MPI Ranking:  773.31

April 5, 2004 – Bottom of the 3rd, no outs

July 22, 2006 – Bottom of the 8th, One out

He hit .263 as the starting second baseman in the beginning of 2004.  However, an injury in late July ended his first season.  In 2005, Graffanino played equal time at first, second and third base.  His batting average improved to .298.  In mid-July, he was traded to the Boston Red Sox.  He re-signed with Kansas City in 2006 as a utility player.  Graffanino had a .274 batting average in 203 appearances during his time with the Kansas City Royals.


#151 – Don Slaught (7) – Catcher (1982-1984) – 183rd Player

MPI Ranking:  774.50

July 6, 1982 – Started Game

October 5, 1984 – American League Championship Series – End of Game

He made his major league debut with Kansas City.  He was the backup catcher until 1984 when he became the primary catcher.  He helped the Royals make the playoffs that season.  Slaught hit .283 in Kansas City and was catcher for 1,943 1/3 innings.


#150 – Onix Concepcion (22) – Shortstop (1980-1985) – 154th Player

MPI Ranking:  775.46

August 30, 1980 – Top of the 10th, no outs

October 26, 1980 – WORLD SERIES – End of Game

Concepcion had playing time in both the 1980 and 1985 World Series’.  He was the Royals primary shortstop in 1984 and 1985.  He was considered one of the fastest players on the team.  He hit .238 with the Kansas City Royals.


#149 – Bip Roberts (1) – Utility Player (1996-1997) – 391st Player

MPI Ranking:  778.35

April 2, 1996 – OPENING DAY – Started Game – Top of the 1st, 1st AB

August 28, 1997 – End of Game

Leon “Bip” Roberts was the opening day second baseman for the Kansas City Royals in 1996.  He hit .283 with 12 stolen bases in Kansas City.  In 1997, Roberts was converted to a left fielder due to the acquisition of Jose Offerman.  He played 82 games in the position, hitting .309 and stealing 15 bases.  Roberts hit .296 in his two seasons with the Royals.


#148 – Vince Coleman (29) – Left Field (1994-1995) – 359th Player

MPI Ranking:  780.55

April 4, 1994 – OPENING DAY – Started Game – Top of the 1st, 1st AB

October 2, 1995 – End of Game

In his first season with Kansas City, the veteran stole 50 bases and was the everyday left fielder with the Royals, despite it being a shortened season due to the baseball strike.  He played 1,366 1/3 innings in left field.

He batted .259 with Kansas City.


#147 – Jay Bell (28) – Shortstop (1997) – 407th Player

MPI Ranking:  783.45

April 2, 1997 – OPENING DAY – Started Game

September 27, 1997 – Top of the 8th, Two Outs

He started 144 games with the Kansas City Royals at shortstop batting .291 with 28 home runs.  On June 27, 1997, Bell hit a grand slam against the Milwaukee Brewers in the fourth inning.  He was second in the American League at shortstop in assists with 450 and second in double plays turned with 102.  Jay Bell’s 1997 season was one of the most productive offensive seasons by a shortstop in team history.  


#146 – Bill Butler (29) – Starting Pitcher (1969-1971) – 19th Player

MPI Ranking:  787.22

First Game – April 9, 1969 – Top of the 8th, no outs

Last Game – September 21, 1971 – SECOND GAME – End of the Top of the 5th

Butler made his major league debut with Kansas City.  He was pitched primarily as a starter for the Royals.  He had a 3.80 ERA with a 14-24 record in Kansas City.  In his rookie season, he was ranked 10th in the voting for American League Rookie-of-the-Year.


#145 – Edinson Volquez (36) – Starting Pitcher (2015-2016) – 802nd Player

MPI Ranking:  789.71

April 9, 2015 – Started Game

October 1, 2016 – End of the Top of the 5th

In 2015, Volquez became the most consistent pitcher in the Royals’ starting rotation.  He was the only pitcher to pitch over 200 innings during the season.  His efforts help propel the Royals into the playoffs for the second-straight season.  He was instrumental in helping the Royals win their second-ever World Series title.  He pitched in the World Series despite the death of his father in the Dominican Republic.  He had a 23-20 record while in Kansas City with a 4.43 ERA in 68 appearances.


#144 – Wally Bunker (27) – Starting Pitcher (1969-1971) – 1st Player

MPI Ranking:  792.98

First Game – April 8, 1969 – OPENING DAY – Started Game

Last Game – May 26, 1971 – End of Game

First starting pitcher in franchise history.  Had a 3.70 ERA with the Royals over three seasons.  Bunker was known for is outstanding sinker ball.  He ended his major league career with Kansas City when he developed arm problems.  He was 16-25 in his Royals career.


#143 – Kyle Davies (34) – Starting Pitcher (2007-2011) – 661st Player

MPI Ranking:  795.50

August 4, 2007 – Started Game

July 25, 2011 – End of the Top of the 6th

He bounced back and forth from AAA Omaha and Kansas City in his first two seasons with Kansas City.  He became a full-time part of the rotation in 2009.  He had a 29-44 in 531 record during innings pitched with the Royals.  His 5.34 career ERA is the highest of any starting pitcher in Royals history.


#142 – Kevin McReynolds (22) – Left Field (1992-1993) – 322nd Player

MPI Ranking:  812.86

April 6, 1992 – OPENING DAY – Started Game – Top of the 1st, 4th AB

October 3, 1993 – End of Game

The trade for Kevin McReynolds outraged many Royals fans because they did not want to see the departure of Saberhagen from Kansas City.  McReynolds was the 1992 opening day right fielder for the Royals, but played most of the season in left field.  He played 1,630 innings in left field for the Royals.  He batted .246 with Kansas City.


#141 – Keith Lockhart (4) – Second Base (1995-1996) – 377th Player

MPI Ranking:  824.37

June 5, 1995 – Started Game

September 29, 1996 – End of Game

He hit .321 in 94 appearances with the Royals, including six home runs, 33 RBIs and eight stolen bases during his first season.  In 1996, Lockhart switched to third base on opening day and split his time between third and second base.  He hit .273 for the Royals in 1996 with 11 stolen bases and seven home runs.  Lockhart hit .291 with the Royals in 232 appearances.  He logged 1,015 innings at second base.


#140 – Desi Relaford (12) – Second Base (2003-2004) – 537th Player

MPI Ranking:  826.77

March 31, 2003 – Bottom of the 8th, One out

October 1, 2004 – End of Game

Relaford split time at second base with the slumping Carlos Febles.  His role, however, changed in 2004 when Relaford became a utility player, having time in both the outfield and infield.  Relaford had a .240 career batting average in 255 appearances with the Royals.


#139 – Pat Tabler (30) – Utility Outfield (1988-1990) – 258th Player

MPI Ranking:  832.78

June 4, 1988 – Started Game

August 30, 1990 – End of Game

Tabler split his time in his first season with the Royals between left field and designated hitter.  Tabler hit .309 with 49 RBIs for the Royals.  In 1989, Tabler was the opening day designated hitter.  Tabler hit .279 in 287 appearances in his Royals career.


#138 – Roberto Hernandez (39) – Closing Pitcher (2001-2002) – 502nd Player

MPI Ranking:  852.83

April 4, 2001 – Bottom of the 8th, no outs

September 25, 2002 – End of the Top of the 9th

Hernandez instantly became the Royals closer in 2001.  He pitched in 63 games and had 28 saves, despite having a lofty 4.12 ERA.  His numbers stayed consistent into the next season with 26 saves in 53 appearances and an ERA of 4.33.  Hernandez had a 4.21 career ERA with the Royals in 116 relief and a 6-9 record.


#137 – Chris Getz (17) – Second Base (2010-2013) – 702nd Player

MPI Ranking:  860.51

April 5, 2010 – OPENING DAY – Started Game

September 28, 2013 – End of Game

Getz was the backup second baseman in his first season in Kansas City for Mike Aviles.  In 2011, Getz was the opening day second baseman and played there most of the season.He is currently fifth all-time for innings played at second base with 2,453 2/3.  Getz had a .248 batting average with Kansas City.


#136 – Omar Infante (14) – Second Base (2014-2016) – 778th Player

MPI Ranking:  863.75

March 31, 2014 – OPENING DAY – Started Game

June 6, 2016 – End of Game

The veteran Infante was acquired in 2014 filled the second base position with a much better bat and fielding accuracy.  Infante hit .252 in 135 games for the Royals. With his playoff experience, he helped the Royals make their first playoff berth in 29 years.  During the 2015 season, Infante was hitting .264 by mid-May and was in the running to be a starter on the All-Star team for the American League.  He had seven RBIs in one game on September 21, 2015, but then suffered from an oblique strain that ended his season. Infante is seventh all-time with 2,566  innings player at second base and ended his Royals career hitting .238.


#135 – Jeremy Affeldt (48) – Middle Relief Pitcher (2002-2006) – 519th Player

MPI Ranking:  872.78

April 6, 2002 – Top of the 6th, no outs

July 29, 2006 – End of the Bottom of the 7th

Jeremy Affeldt made his major league debut with Kansas City.  Despite being nagged with blisters on his hand, Affeldt substantially split time with the Royals in both the bullpen and starting rotation.  Affeldt went 17-22 with a 4.77 ERA with the Kansas City Royals in 399 2/3 innings pitched.


#134 – Yuniesky Betancourt (3) – Shortstop (2009-2010, 2012) – 696th Player

MPI Ranking:  879.79

July 17, 2009 – Started Game

August 5, 2012 – End of Game

Yuniesky Betancourt defected from Cuba in 2003.  In 2009, he replaced shortstop Mike Aviles after he sustained a season-ending injury.  BHe was named the opening day shortstop in 2010.  During the season, Betancourt became only the second Royals player to hit three grand slam home runs in one season.  He was ranked one of the five best defensive shortstops in the major league for the 2010 season.  At the end of the season, Betancourt was traded, but returned after just one season.  Betancourt hit .248 in his career with the Royals.


#133 – Pat Kelly (18) – Right Field (1969-1970) – 12th Player

MPI Ranking:  897.56

First Game – April 8, 1969 – Bottom of the 6th, Two outs

Last Game – September 30, 1970 – End of Game

Kelly was the primary right fielder for Kansas City for the first two years of the franchise.  His brother is in the Football Hall of Fame.  He hit .249 while in Kansas City with 14 home runs and 74 stolen bases.  He would become a minister after his baseball career.


#132 – Fran Healy (16) – Catcher (1969, 1973-1976) – 37th Player

MPI Ranking:  903.93

First Game – September 3, 1969 – Started Game

Last Game – May 12, 1976 – End of Game

Healy played 10 games with the Royals in 1969 and was traded in 1970.  He returned to be the primary catcher for Kansas City between 1972 and 1974.  He led the American League in games caught in 1974.  He hit .258 with Kansas City and was traded to the New York Yankees for Larry Gura.


#131 – Mitch Maier (12) – Center Field (2006-2012) – 643rd Player

MPI Ranking:  906.70

September 23, 2006 – Top of the 5th, no outs

June 30, 2012 – FIRST GAME – End of Game

Mitch Maier made his major league debut with the Royals in 2006.  His first full season came as a utility outfielder in 2009.  He played all outfield positions until a season ending injury to center fielder Coco Crisp gave Maier the opportunity to become the everyday player at the position.  Maier 10th played 1,532 1/3 innings with the Royals with a .248 batting average.


#130 – Tom Burgmeier (22) – Middle Relief Pitcher (1969-1973) – 10th Player

MPI Ranking:  912.07

First Game – April 8, 1969 – Top of the 6th, no outs

Last Game – May 1, 1973 – End of Game

He was the first pitcher in franchise history to come into a game in relief.  He was primarily a middle relief pitcher between 1969 and 1971.  In 1972, he split time as a closer for the Royals.  He had a career 4.33 ERA and a 24-16 record in 196 appearances.  He would eventually become a pitching coach for the Royals.


#129 – Felix Jose (34) – Right Field (1993-1995) – 342nd Player

MPI Ranking:  912.50

April 5, 1993 – OPENING DAY – Started Game

May 12, 1995 – End of Game

In his first season with the Royals, Jose hit .253 with 31 stolen bases.  During the strike-shortened 1994 season, Jose improved his numbers with .303 batting average and 11 home runs.  He was a career .269 hitter for the Royals with 41 stolen bases.  His 1,961 1/3 innings in right field ranks Jose sixth all-time in franchise history.


#128 – Aaron Guiel (45) – Right Field (2002-2006) – 528th Player

MPI Ranking:  919.50

June 22, 2002 – Top of the 9th, One out

May 28, 2006 – End of Game

Guiel was primarily a right fielder in his career with Kansas City, but occasionally played in other positions in the outfield.  Guiel hit .245 in his career with the Royals and played 1,359 2/3 innings in right field.


#127 – Mike MacDougal (54) – Closing Pitcher (2001-2006) – 516th Player

MPI Ranking:  920.98

September 22, 2001 – Started Game

July 22, 2006 – End of the Top of the 9th

MacDougal started his career as a starting.  In 2001, during his final start, he was struck in the head by a bat that came loose from the hands of Carlos Beltran and he suffered a fractured skull.  He returned in 2003 and became one of the best closers in the American League, picked to be on the All-Star team.  MacDougal is seventh all-time in career saves with the Royals, earning 50 in 162 appearances.  He also had 162 strikeouts in 174 innings pitched.  He was 10-14 with a 3.88 ERA.


#126 – Tom Poquette (25) – Left Field (1973-1979, 1982) – 85th Player

MPI Ranking:  922.40

September 1, 1973 – Top of the 9th, no outs

July 9, 1982 – End of the Bottom of the 6th

He made his major league debut in 1973.  However, he made his big break in 1976, helping the Royals to their first playoff berth.  Due to a freak accident in 1976 by slamming into the outfield wall, the Royals first installed pads in the outfield.  He was the best-hitting rookie that season.  Poquette hit a career .266 with the Kansas City Royals.


#125 – Esteban German (3) – Utility Player (2006-2008) – 622nd Player

MPI Ranking:  922.95

April 5, 2006 – Top of the 8th, no outs

September 28, 2008 – End of Game

In 2006, German had his big break with the Royals, making 106 appearances as a utility player in several different positions.  In 2007, German narrowed his defensive positions to third base and second base.  He was a career .280 hitter for the Royals in 316 appearances.


#124 – Ken Harvey (28) – First Base (2001-2005) – 514th Player

MPI Ranking:  931.55

September 18, 2001 – Started Game – Top of the 2nd, Two outs (DH)

May 18, 2005 – End of Game

Harvey made his major league debut with the Royals.  In his first season, he split time with Mike Sweeney as designated hitter and first baseman.  In 2004, he had the best season of his career and was picked to be on the All-Star Team.  Harvey hit .274 in his career with the Royals and logged 1,500 1/3 innings at first base.


#123 – Dean Palmer (16) – Third Base (1997-1998) – 426th Player

MPI Ranking:  933.00

July 26, 1997 – Started Game

September 27, 1998 – End of Game

In 1997, Palmer made an immediate impact mid-season, hitting .278 with nine home runs and 31 RBIs in 49 appearances.  In 1998, Palmer became one of the best third basemen in the American League.  He hit 34 home runs, just two shy of the team record, and batted in 119 runs.  Palmer was selected to the 1998 All-Star team at third base.  He was ranked the third best fielding third baseman in the American League and he became only the second Royals third baseman, other than George Brett, to win the Silver Slugger Award at that position.  Palmer hit .278 in his short time in Kansas City.  He logged 1,530 innings at third base.


#122 – Mark Littell (17) – Closing Pitcher (1973-1977) – 79th Player

MPI Ranking:  937.28

June 14, 1973 – Started Game

October 9, 1977 – American League Championship Series – End of the Top of the 9th

Mark Little was the second-youngest pitcher to start a game in franchise history.  Considered a bit “flaky,” Littell ended up becoming a closing pitcher for the Royals.  In 1976, he was one of the best relief pitchers in the major leagues and helped the Royals to their first playoff-berth.  Littell ended his Royals career with a 3.32 ERA and 28 saves.  He is one of only four Royals pitchers to have an at bat in an American League game during the Designated Hitter Era.


#121 – Jason Vargas (51) – Starting Pitcher (2014-2017) – 779th Player

MPI Ranking:  942.21

April 2, 2014 – Started Game

October 1, 2017 – Top of the 5th, no outs

Vargas became a part of the starting rotation in 2014 which helped the Royals to their first playoff berth in 29 years.  He missed most of 2015 and 2016 due to injury, but in 2017 became one of the top starting pitchers in the major leagues.  Vargas was named to the All-Star team and ended the season with a 18-11 with a 4.16 ERA.  He had a 34-23 record with Kansas City and a career 3.88 ERA.  


#120 – Melky Cabrera (53) – Center Field (2011, 2017) – 723rd Player

MPI Ranking:  950.25

March 31, 2011 – OPENING DAY – Started Game

October 1, 2017 – End of the Bottom of the 5th

In 2011, Cabrera became an instant star on the team, hitting .305 for the season.  He had 18 home runs, 102 RBIs and 20 stolen bases.  He was fourth in the American League in hits with 201 and only the sixth player in Royals history to have over 200 hits.  Cabrera, along with Alex Gordon and Jeff Francoeur, became the best outfield in major league baseball.  He led the American League in double plays turned by an outfielder.  At the end of the season, he was traded to San Francisco.  He returned to the Royals in 2017 with great success.  He played 1,265 2/3 innings in center field with Kansas City and had a .296 batting average.


#119 – Whit Merrifield (15) – Utility Player (2016-2017) – 826th Player

MPI Ranking:  960.19

May 18, 2016 – SECOND GAME – Started Game

October 1, 2017 – End of Game

He made his major league debut with the Royals.  He proved himself to be extremely versatile, playing six different fielding positions with Kansas City.  He became an internet sensation with a viral YouTube video and a collection of fans that called him “Two-Hit Whit.”  Merrifield has logged 1,645 1/3 innings with Kansas City at second base.  He has hit .286 with 42 stolen bases with the Royals.


#118 – David Cone (17) – Starting Pitcher (1986, 1993-1994) – 227th Player

MPI Ranking:  962.66

June 8, 1986 – Top of the 9th, no outs

August 7, 1994 – Top of the 7th, No outs

David Cone was born and raised in Kansas City, Missouri and made his major league debut with Kansas City.  After the 1986 season, he was tradedto the New York Mets.  He returned to Kansas City in 1993 as the highest paid pitcher in the major leagues.  In 1994, Cone e pitched a 2.94 ERA with a 16-5 record in the strike-shortened season.  Between May 11 and May 22, 1994, Cone pitched three straight complete game shutouts.  He finished the season the American League Cy Young Award winner.  Cone had a 3.29 career ERA with the Royals and a 27-19 record.  He had 344 strikeouts in 449 innings pitched with the Royals.


#117 – Bob Hamelin (3) – Designated Hitter (1993-1996) – 356th Player

MPI Ranking:  968.34

September 12, 1993 – Bottom of the 8th, One out

September 22, 1996 – End of the Top of the 8th

He made his major league debut with Kansas City.  In 1994, Bob Hamelin became the first rookie in Royals history to start on opening day as designated hitter.  He hit six home runs in his first month in the majors and was batting .361.  Hamelin ended up hitting 24 home runs on the season along with 65 RBIs and a .282 batting average. Hamelin was the American League Rookie-of-the-Year.  Hamelin hit a career .241 for the Kansas City Royals with 42 home runs.  His career 648 plate appearances as a designated hitter is seventh all-time in franchise history.


#116 – Pat Sheridan (15) – Right Field (1981-1985) – 167th Player

MPI Ranking:  976.39

September 16, 1981 – Bottom of the 9th, no outs

October 26, 1985 – WORLD SERIES – End of the Top of the 9th

He made his major league debut with Kansas City.  He became the everyday right fielder for Kansas City in 1983 and helped the Royals win their first World Series title in 1985.  He hit .267 in his Royals career with 42 stolen bases. He played 1,632 1/3 innings in right field.


#115 – Ted Abernathy (36) – Closing Pitcher (1970-1972) – 49th Player

MPI Ranking:  978.14

July 2, 1970 – Bottom of the 8th, no outs

September 30, 1972 – End of the Bottom of the 5th

Abernathy was the first pitcher in franchise history to have 20 saves in a season.  He was a side-arm pitcher due to past surgeries.  He holds the franchise record by pitching in six straight games in 1970.  He had a 2.31 ERA in 144 games with the Royals.  He also recorded 40 saves.


#114 – Jim Rooker (13) – Starting Pitcher (1969-1972) – 26th Player

MPI Ranking:  996.20

First Game – April 27, 1969 – Top of the 7th, No outs

Last Game – July 18, 1972 – SECOND GAME – Top of the 7th, no outs

Rooker was a starting pitcher for Kansas City for their first three seasons.  He was considered one of the best hitting pitchers in baseball.  He became the first player in franchise history to hit two home runs in a single game.  He holds the club record for the most home runs by a pitcher with five in his career.  As a pitcher, he had a 21-44 record and an ERA of 3.93 with Kansas City.


#113 – Brian Bannister (19) – Starting Pitcher (2007-2010) – 654th Player

MPI Ranking:  1,002.49

April 24, 2007 – Started Game

September 17, 2010 – End of Game

In his first season, Bannister became a part of the Royals starting rotation.  He was named the Rookie-of-the-Month in 2007 and finished the season in third place for American League Rookie-of-the-Year honors.  He ended the season with a 3.87 ERA and a 12-9 record, leading the team in wins for the season.  Bannister finished his Royals career with a 35-49 record and ERA of 5.13 in 108 starts.


#112 – Chris Haney (33) – Starting Pitcher (1992-1998) – 338th Player

MPI Ranking:  1,008.27

August 31, 1992 – Started Game

September 4, 1998 – Bottom of the 7th, Two outs

He was immediately placed in the starting lineup in 1992, starting seven games in his first season with the Royals.  His big break came in 1996, when he started 35 games for the Kansas City.  He became the second-most productive starter behind Tim Belcher and had a career high 228 innings pitched.  Haney had a 33-40 record with the Royals in 99 starts.


#111 – Luis Aquino (27) – Middle Relief Pitcher (1988-1992) – 262nd Player

MPI Ranking:  1,019.79

August 9, 1988 – Started Game

September 26, 1992 – Bottom of the 2nd, Two outs

Aquino spent time with Kansas City as both a starter and relief pitcher.  Despite suffering from numerous injuries in Kansas City, Aquino’s overall record with the Royals was 22-19 with 55 starts in 114 appearances.


#110 – Roger Nelson (35) – Starting Pitcher (1969-1972, 1976) – 17th Player

MPI Ranking:  1,027.69

First Game – April 9, 1969 – Started Game

Last Game – September 23, 1976 – Top of the 4th, no outs

Known as “Spider” Nelson, he was starting pitcher with the Royals.  His first two season were plagued with injuries, but in 1972, he pitched a 2.02 ERA with 120 strikeouts and only 31 walks and named the Royals Player-of-the-Year.  After the 1972 season, he was a part of a trade with the Cincinnati Reds that brought Hal McRae to Kansas City.  He briefly pitched for the Royals in 1976.  He had a career 3.03 ERA with the Royals and a 18-22 record.


#109 – Bill Pecota (32) – Utility Player (1986-1991) – 234th Player

MPI Ranking:  1,035.69

September 19, 1986 – Bottom of the 7th, no outs

October 5, 1991 – End of Game

Bill Pecota made his major league debut with Kansas City.  He earned the nickname “I-29” due to the number of times he travelled between Kansas City and AAA Omaha. He became the only Royals player in franchise history to play every position during his career in Kansas City.  Bill Pecota also has the distinction of having a baseball statistic named after him, called PECOTA (Player Empirical Comparison and Optimization Test Algorithm).  He hit .254 with 41 stolen bases with Kansas City.


#108 – David Howard (6) – Shortstop (1991-1997) – 304th Player

MPI Ranking:  1,037.74

April 14, 1991 – Started Game

September 3, 1997 – End of Game

He made his major league debut with Kansas City.  Howard primarily played shortstop in his first, but did play four other positions.  He bounced back and forth from the minors until 1995, when he became a full-time utility player.  In 1996, he was the full-time shortstop and had the best fielding percentage of any shortstop in the American League.  Howard is eighth all-time in Royals history for innings played at shortstop with 2,626 2/3.  He finished his Royals career with a .229 batting average.


#107 – Jorge Orta (3) – Designated Hitter (1984-1987) – 202nd Player

MPI Ranking:  1,045.32

April 4, 1984 – Started Game

June 10, 1987 – End of Game

In his first season with Kansas City, Orta platooned at designated hitter with Hal McRae in a “lefty-righty” switch.  It became very successful and carried over into 1985, where Orta helped the Royals win their first-ever World Series title.  Orta hit .277 in his Royals career with 24 home runs and 145 RBIs.  He is sixth all-time in franchise history for plate appearances as designated hitter with 1,014.


#106 – Pete LaCock (8) – First Base (1977-1980) – 116th Player

MPI Ranking:  1,046.17

April 9, 1977 – Started Game

October 15, 1980 – WORLD SERIES – End of Game

He is the son of Peter Marshall, the long-time host of the television show “Hollywood Squares.”  He was a utility player early with the Royals. However, he became the everyday first baseman with the departure of John Mayberry.  He played in three League Championships and made a brief appearance in the 1980 World Series at first base.  He hit .277 with Kansas City.


#105 – James Shields (33) – Starting Pitcher (2013-2014) – 761st Player

MPI Ranking:  1,052.35

April 1, 2013 – OPENING DAY – Started Game

October 26, 2014 – WORLD SERIES – End of the Bottom of the 6th

Shields became the ace of the rotation in 2013, leading the league in games started.  He was known as “Big Game James,” after his boyhood hero James Worthy of the Los Angeles Lakers.  His abilities carried over to the 2014 season, leading the team with 14 victories along with Yordano Ventura.  He averaged 6 2/3 innings per game and led the team in strikeouts with 180. Shields was the ace pitcher on one of the best starting rotations in baseball and helped lead the Royals to their first playoff berth in 29 years.  Shields had a 27-17 record and a 3.18 ERA in 68 starts with Kansas City.


#104 – Mike Hedlund (32) – Starting Pitcher (1969-1972) – 25th Player

MPI Ranking:  1,065.18

First Game – April 11, 1969 – Top of the 8th, no outs

Last Game – September 30, 1972 – End of Game

Hedlund was nicknamed “Booger Red” due to his red hair and freckles.  Despite struggling in this first three seasons in Kansas City, Hedlund had a 15-8 record in 1972, placing him fourth in the American League.  He ended his Royals career with a 3.56 ERA and a 25-24 record.


#103 – Darryl Motley (24) – Right Field (1981-1986) – 165th Player

MPI Ranking:  1,066.87

August 10, 1981 – Started Game

September 19, 1986 – End of Game

Motley made his major league debut with Kansas City.  In became an everyday player in 1984.  In 1985, he helped the Royals win their first-ever World Series title.  Motley hit a career .245 for the Royals.  Motley played 1,155 2/3 innings in left field and his 1,780 innings played in right field.


#102 – Mike Aviles (30) – Utility Infield (2008-2011) – 674th Player

MPI Ranking:  1,067.71

May 29, 2008 – Started Game

July 27, 2011 – End of Game

Aviles made his major league debut with Kansas City.  He hit an amazing .325 in 102 appearances with the Royals in his rookie season with 10 home runs and 51 RBIs.  The Royals named him Player of the Year in 2008 and he finished fourth in the American League Rookie-of-the-Year Awards.  Mike Aviles finished with a .286 batting average for the Royals.  He played 1,150 innings at shortstop and 1,036 2/3 innings at second base while in Kansas City.


#101 – Jim Wohlford (6) – Left Field (1972-1976) – 70th Player

MPI Ranking:  1,072.73

September 1, 1972 – Bottom of the 8th, no outs

October 14, 1976 – American League Championship Series – End of Game

He was primarily a left fielder for the Royals in the early and mid-1970s.  Wohlford had two inside-the-park home runs in his career with Kansas City.  He hit .261 with 51 stolen bases with Kansas City.  He helped Royals to their first-ever playoff berth in 1976.


#100 – Jamie Quirk (9) – Catcher (1975-1976, 1979-1982, 1985-1988) – 102nd Player

MPI Ranking:  1,080.26

September 4, 1975 – Top of the 9th, One out

October 2, 1988 – End of Game

Quirk appeared in a Royals uniform for 11 of his 17 years in the major leagues.  Quirk was a very versatile player, playing every position except pitcher and center field early in his career.  He finally settled down as a backup catcher by the late 1980s.  He appeared in the playoffs in 1976 and in 1985 for Kansas City.  He played for seven other teams besides the Royals in his career.  He hit .245 with Kansas City.  After his playing career, Quirk became a bullpen and bench coach for the Royals from 1994 to 2001.


#99 – Alberto Callaspo (13) – Second Base (2008-2010) – 668th Player

MPI Ranking:  1,097.50

April 4, 2008 – Top of the 8th, no outs

July 21, 2010 – End of Game

He was a utility infielder in his first season with the Royals as a backup to Mark Grudzielanek at second base and Tony Pena, Jr. at shortstop.  He hit .305 in his first season.  Callaspo ended his Royals career playing 1,704 2/3 innings second base with a .293 batting average.


#98 – Rey Sanchez (1) – Shortstop (1999-2001) – 455th Player

MPI Ranking:  1,119.82

April 5, 1999 – OPENING DAY – Started Game

October 7, 2001 – End of the Bottom of the 4th

He was the opening day shortstop all three of his seasons he was with the Royals.  He was considered one of the top fielding shortstops in the American League. Sanchez hit .289 for the Royals and is seventh all-time for innings played at shortstop with 3,177 2/3 in 377 games played.


#97 – Gil Meche (55) – Starting Pitcher (2007-2010) – 645th Player

MPI Ranking:  1,126.86

April 2, 2007 – OPENING DAY – Started Game

October 3, 2010 – End of the Top of the 8th

When he signed with Kansas City, it was the largest contract for a pitcher in franchise history.  In his first two seasons, Meche led the American League in starts.  His ERA over the first two season was a respectable 3.82.  In 2008, he had his only winning season with the Royals with an 14-11 record.  Meche retired from major league baseball with a 29-39 record with the Kansas City Royals and finished his Kansas City career with a 4.27 ERA in 111 games pitched.


#96 – Matt Stairs (12) – Utility Player (2004-2006) – 567th Player

MPI Ranking:  1,129.62

April 5, 2004 – Bottom of the 9th, One out  (appeared at plate only)

July 30, 2006 – End of the Top of the 5th

Stairs was a Canadian player who would go on to play for 12 different teams, more than any other position player in major league history.  In his first season, Stairs was a everyday utility player.  He split time as an outfielder, first baseman, and designated hitter.  He hit two grand slam home runs with Kansas City.  Stairs hit .269 in 330 appearances for the Royals and hit 39 home runs while in Kansas City.  


#95 – Mark Quinn (14) – Left Field (1999-2002) – 473rd Player

MPI Ranking:  1,129.91

September 14, 1999 – SECOND GAME – Started Game – Bottom of the 1st, Two outs (DH)

June 7, 2002 – End of the Top of the 1st

He made his major league debut with Kansas City.  He hit two home runs in his first-ever game, only the third major league player ever to do so in the first career game.  Quinn’s performance in the 2000 season earned him American League Rookie-of-the-Year honors. He hit .282 with the Kansas City Royals along with hitting 45 home runs.  He logged 1,211 1/3 innings in left field.


#94 – Bruce Dal Canton (43) – Starting Pitcher (1971-1975) – 56th Player

MPI Ranking:  1,131.15

April 10, 1971 – Started Game

May 3, 1975 – End of Game

Bruce Dal Canton was a part of a trade that also brought Freddie Patek and Jerry May to the Royals in late 1970 from the Pittsburgh Pirates.  He split time with the Royals as a starter and a relief pitcher.  He started in 65 of his 127 games with the Royals and had a 3.75 ERA.  His Royals record was 26-27 with five saves.  He was a bit wild as a pitcher, leading the American League with 16 in 1974.  He pitched 555 innings for Kansas City.


#93 – Lonnie Smith (21) – Left Field (1985-1987) – 217th Player

MPI Ranking:  1,132.81

May 19, 1985 – Started Game

September 27, 1987 – End of Game

Smith was acquired from St. Louis during the 1985 season.  Nicknamed “Skates,” Smith made an immediate impact.  That season, Smith batted .257 with 40 stolen bases.  He helped the Royals win the 1985 World Series against the St. Louis Cardinals, becoming the only player in baseball history to play in the World Series against the team that traded him away in the same season.  Lonnie Smith is sixth all-time in innings played in left field with 2,164 1/3 innings.  His career batting average for the Royals was .270 and he amassed 75 stolen bases in 95 tries.


#92 – Clint Hurdle (10) – Right Field (1977-1981) – 123rd Player

MPI Ranking:  1,142.50

September 18, 1977 – Started Game

October 9, 1981 – American League Division Series – End of Game

In 1978, Clint Hurdle was the opening day first baseman for the Royals.  Prior to opening day, Hurdle was featured as “This Year’s Phenom”  in baseball by Sports Illustrated and he was featured on the cover of the magazine.  He split his time evenly between first base, right field and left field early in his career.   In 1980, Hurdle became the full-time right fielder for the Royals, hitting .294 with 10 home runs in the season.  He hit .417 in the 1980 World Series.  He hit .276 in his career as a Royals player with 26 home runs.


#91 – Tim Belcher (41) – Starting Pitcher (1996-1998) – 397th Player

MPI Ranking:  1,143.02

April 5, 1996 – Started Game

September 27, 1998 – End of the Top of the 5th

In his first season, Belcher was a part of the starting rotation and started 35 games with a 15-11 record and a 3.92 ERA.  In 1997, Belcher had the best fielding percentage of any pitcher in the American League.  Belcher was the predominate starter in the rotation all three season he pitched with the Royals.  Belcher had a career 4.38 ERA with the Royals in 101 starts and a 42-37 record.  He was one of the few starting pitchers for Kansas City in the late 1990s with a winning record.  


#90 – Jose Guillen (11) – Right Field (2008-2010) – 665th Player

MPI Ranking:  1,148.47

March 31, 2008 – OPENING DAY – Started Game

August 4, 2010 – End of Game

In his first season, Guillen split his time in right field with Mark Teahen and split his other games as designated hitter with Billy Butler.  He led the team in home runs with 20.  He was suppose to serve a suspension in 2009 because his name was brought up in the Mitchell Report for using performance-enhancing drugs.  However, the suspension was rescinded when a deal was made between the players’ union and MLB.  Guillen’s batting average with the Kansas City Royals was .256 with 45 home runs and 199 RBIs.


#89 – Yordano Ventura (30) – Starting Pitcher (2013-2016) – 775th Player

MPI Ranking:  1,149.19

September 17, 2013 – Started Game

September 30, 2016 – End of the Top of the 6th

He was known as “Ace Ventura.”  He astounded players with his fastball which was clocked at over 100 miles per hour.  In 2014, Ventura made the starting rotation and became an instant success.  He had more starts than any other rookie pitcher in Royals history that season.  Ventura helped catapult the Royals into their first playoff berth in 29 years.  In 2015, he was named the Opening Day starter for the Royals. In 2015, he helped the Royals win their second-ever world title against the New York Mets.  After the 2016 season, Ventura was tragically killed in a car accident in the Dominican Republic at the age of 25 years.  He is the only player to die while playing for the Royals in franchise history.  He had a 3.89 career ERA in Kansas City and 38-31 record and will be remembered as one of the intense pitchers in Royals’ history.


#88 – Steve Mingori (23) – Middle Relief Pitcher (1973-1979) – 80th Player

MPI Ranking:  1,154.38

July 11, 1973 – Bottom of the 3rd, Two outs

September 2, 1979 – End of Game

Mingori was a Kansas City native who attended Rockhurst High School.  He became a full-time long relief pitcher who carried a 2.81 ERA in his first full season with the Royals.  Mingori pitched in all three American League Championships of the 1970s against the New York Yankees.  Despite having a 16-25 record with the Royals in his career, Mingori had a 3.05 career ERA with 217 strikeouts in 439 innings pitched.  He had 27 career saves and 22 career holds for the Kansas City Royals.  He finished his major league career with the Royals.


#87 – Jeff Francoeur (21) – Right Field (2011-2013) – 723rd Player

MPI Ranking:  1,159.53

March 31, 2011 – OPENING DAY – Started Game

June 29, 2013 – End of Game

Francoeur led the American league with assists from right field with 16 and led in putouts with 327 in 2011..  Francoeur, along with Melky Cabrera and Alex Gordon, became the best outfield in major league baseball.  Francoeur is fourth all-time for innings played in right field with 3,074 2/3.  He hit .254 in his Royals career.


#86 – Greg Gagne (7) – Shortstop (1993-1995) – 342nd Player

MPI Ranking:  1,160.17

April 5, 1993 – OPENING DAY – Started Game

September 29, 1995 – End of Game

Gagne was considered one of the best defensive shortstops in all of baseball.  He led the American League with the fewest errors and best fielding percentage of any shortstop.  He hit a respectable .280 with 10 home runs and 57 RBIs.  Gagne hit a career .266 with the Royals and is sixth all-time in innings played at shortstop with 3,261 in 386 games played.


#85 – Jeremy Guthrie (11) – Starting Pitcher (2012-2015) – 756th Player

MPI Ranking:  1,177.32

July 22, 2012 – Started Game

September 26, 2015 – Top of the 6th, One out

Upon arriving in Kansas City from Colorado, Guthrie instantly became the best pitcher on the starting rotation in the second half of the season.  His nickname was “J-Guts.”  In 2013, he broke a consecutive winning record set by Paul Splittorff with 17 games without a loss.  He helped the Royals to their first playoff berth in 29 years.  He pitched 653 2/3 innings for Kansas City and had a 41-34 record with a 4.38 ERA.


#84 – Kendrys Morales (25) – Designated Hitter (2015-2016) – 800th Player

MPI Ranking:  1,188.86

April 6, 2015 – OPENING DAY – Started Game – Bottom of the 2nd, One out (DH)

October 2, 2016 – Bottom of the 6th, One out

Morales was signed as a free agent in 2015 and became the Royals designated hitter.  His 106 RBIs during the season was the best on the team and sixth in the American League.  He broke George Brett’s single game record with 15 total bases in the game and became only the seventh player since 1900 to accomplish the feat in the major leagues. He helped the Royals to their second World Series title in franchise history and won the 2015 Outstanding Designated Hitter Award.  In 2016, Morales was twice named American League Player-of-the-Week.  He is fifth all-time in plate appearances at designated hitter with a .277 batting average.


#83 – Gary Gaetti (8) – Third Base (1993-1995) – 351st Player

MPI Ranking:  1,208.38

June 24, 1993 – Started Game

October 1, 1995 – End of Game

He hit .256 in 82 games played for the Royals, including 14 home runs in his first half season with Kansas City.

The 1995 season was Gaetti’s best as a member of the Royals.  He hit .261 with 96 RBIs.  He came within one home run of tying the Royals home run record which was previously held by Steve Balboni. He ended his career with the Royals having a .267 average with 61 home runs.  He played 2,332 2/3 innings at third base with the Royals.


#82 – Mark Grudzielanek (15) – Second Base (2006-2008) – 615th Player

MPI Ranking:  1,209.55

April 3, 2006 – OPENING DAY – Started Game

August 1, 2008 – Bottom of the 8th, One out

Grudzielanek became the everyday second baseman for the Kansas City.  In his first season with Kansas City, he was first in the American League in assists and third in fielding percentage as a second baseman.  He also won the American League Gold Glove for second base.  He became only the second Royals player ever to win the award at that position, the other being Frank White.  He was a career .300 hitter with the Royals is fourth all-time in innings played at second base with 2,769 innings.


#81 – Bob Oliver (33) – First Base (1969-1972) – 1st Player

MPI Ranking:  1,210.51

First Game – April 8, 1969 – OPENING DAY – Started Game

Last Game – May 3, 1972 – End of Game

He was the first-ever right fielder in franchise history.  Oliver, however, played most of his Royals career at first base.  He hit the first-ever grand slam in Royals history in 1969.  He was also known as a versatile outfielder besides just first base.  He hit .255 with Kansas City with 49 home runs.


#80 – Tom Goodwin (42) – Center Field (1994-1997) – 361st Player

MPI Ranking:  1,224.14

April 6, 1994 – Top of the 8th, Two outs

July 25, 1997 – End of Game

Tom Goodwin became the opening day center fielder by the Kansas City Royals.  He hit .288 in his first full season with the Royals and he led the American League in sacrifice hits and reaching base on an error.  He led the team and was second in the American league in stolen bases with 50.  He became one of the top defensive center fielders in the league.  In 1996, he increased the number of stolen bases to 66.  Goodwin was one of the last players in major league baseball to be allowed to wear the #42 after it was retired in honor of Jackie Robinson.  Goodwin hit .281 in Kansas City with 150 stolen bases.  He played  2,227 1/3 innings in center field.


#79 – Jeff King (7) – First Base (1997-1999) – 407th Player

MPI Ranking:  1,242.87

April 2, 1997 – OPENING DAY – Started Game

May 21, 1999 – End of Game

Jeff King was a very streaky player in his first season with Kansas City.  His first season ended with a .238 batting average.  He did manage to hit 28 home runs on the season and 112 RBIs.  The 1998 season went better for King.  He hit 24 home runs and improved his batting average to .263.   He abruptly retired in May of 1999.  King is ninth all-time in innings played at first base with 2,408 2/3.  His career average with the Royals .249 with 55 home runs and 216 RBIs.


#78 – Rich Gale (38) – Starting Pitcher (1978-1981) – 127th Player

MPI Ranking:  1,258.36

April 30, 1978 – Started Game

September 21, 1981 – End of the Top of the 5th

He made his major league debut with Kansas City on April 30, 1978.  Rich Gale was the best rookie pitcher of 1978, going 14-8 in 30 starts with an ERA of 3.09.  He became a part of the rotation and helped the Royals to the 1980 World Series.  During the strike of 1981, Gale took a job as a bartender at the Hyatt Regency.  On July 17, 1981, the skywalk at the Hyatt collapsed and killed 114 people and he narrowly escaped.  Gale finished his Royals career with a 4.38 ERA and 335 strikeouts in 104 starts.


#77 – Bruce Chen (52) – Starting Pitcher (2009-2014) – 694th Player

MPI Ranking:  1,259.67

June 27, 2009 – Started Game

August 28, 2014 – End of Game

Chen started as a middle relief pitcher, but by 2010 he was moved to the starting rotation.  By 2012, he led the American League with 34 starts.  After a series of injuries, he was moved to the bullpen in 2013 and pitched brilliantly.  He was a part of the best bullpen in the American League, but was thrust back into the rotation due to injuries from some of the starters.  Bruce Chen finished his Royals career 47-43 with an 4.53 ERA in 718 2/3 innings pitched.  


#76 – Jarrod Dyson (1) – Center Field (2010-2016) – 722nd Player

MPI Ranking:  1,309.07

September 7, 2010 – Top of the 9th, no outs

October 2, 2016 – End of the Top of the 8th

Dyson was the lowest draft pick in franchise history to make the big leagues.  Dyson began as a centerfielder and was known for his baserunning.  Dyson was also instrumental in helping the Royals make their first playoff appearance in 29 years.  Dyson stole four bases in the 2014 post-season and coined the phrase “That What Speed Do,” which became nationally popular during the playoffs.  His efforts in 2015 helped the Kansas City Royals win their second-ever World Series title.  He became the all-time leader in pinch-running appearances with 78 in his career. Dyson hit .260 with the Kansas City Royals and had 176 career stolen bases.  Dyson played 2,890 1/3 innings at centerfield.  


#75 – Jeff Suppan (37) – Starting Pitcher (1998-2002) – 450th Player

MPI Ranking:  1,309.12

September 9, 1998 – Bottom of the 3rd, One out

September 26, 2002 – End of Game

In 1999, Suppan was made the #2 starter for the Royals behind Kevin Appier.  In 2000, Suppan was the opening day pitcher for the Royals.  He had a 10-9 record with 4.94 ERA.  Unfortunately, he gave up more home runs than any other pitcher in the American League with 36.    Suppan had a career 4.73 ERA for the Royals in 133 starts with a 39-51 record.  He pitched 864 2/3 innings with Kansas City.


#74 – Jose Rosado (50) – Starting Pitcher (1996-2000) – 402nd Player

MPI Ranking:  1,335.92

June 12, 1996 – Started Game

April 30, 2000 – Top of the 6th, Two outs

He made his major league debut with Kansas City as a result of an injury to Kevin Appier.  He finished his first year with an impressive 3.21 ERA.  In 1997, Rosado became the ace of the starting rotation.  He pitched a 3.39 ERA before the all-star break and was the sole representative on the All-Star team for the Royals.  On July 8, 1997, Rosado became the only pitcher besides Bret Saberhagen to record a win pitching in the All-Star game.  The 1999 season was the best of Rosado’s career.  He had a 1.93 ERA in his first eight starts, but because of the lack of run support, his record was only 2-2.  He earned another chance to pitch in the All-Star game and ended the season with a 10-14 record with an ERA of 3.85.  Rosado’s record with the Royals was 37-45 with an ERA of 4.27.  He made 112 starts for the Royals in 125 appearances.


#73 – Michael Tucker (24) – Right Field (1995-1996, 2002-2003) – 363rd Player

MPI Ranking:  1,349.52

April 26, 1995 – OPENING DAY – Started Game

September 28, 2003 – End of Game

Prior to the 1992 draft, Tucker played on the 1992 Olympic Baseball team.  He made his major league debut with Kansas City.  Tucker hit .260 in his first two years with the Royals, driving in 16 home runs and 70 RBIs.  He was then traded to Atlanta.  He returned to Kansas City in 2001 and played right field.  In his first season back, he was sixth in the American League in triples.  Tucker finished his two stints with the Royals with a .257 batting average and with 41 home runs.  He played 1,484 innings in right field for Kansas City.


#72 – Brent Mayne (24) – Catcher (1990-1995, 2001-2003) – 298th Player

MPI Ranking:  1,386.31

September 18, 1990 – Started Game

September 28, 2003 – End of the Bottom of the 3rd

Brent Mayne made his major league debut with Kansas City.  He was the backup catcher to Mike Macfarlane from 1991 to 1994 and the primary catcher in 1995.  In 1991, Mayne caught Bret Saberhagen’s no-hitter against the Chicago White Sox.  In 1996, Mayne was traded, but returned to Kansas City in 2001.  He was the primary catcher for the Royals for his final two years in Kansas City.  Mayne is third all-time in innings played as catcher with 4,965 1/3.  He had a .244 career batting average with the Royals in 664 appearances.


#71 – Hipolito Pichardo (35) – Middle Relief Pitcher (1992-1998) – 329th Player

MPI Ranking:  1,388.57

April 21, 1992 – Top of the 4th, Two outs

August 20, 1998 – End of the Bottom of the 5th

He made his major league debut with Kansas City.  He was nicknamed him “Double D,” meaning, “Debajo, Dinero.”  He split time as both a starter and relief pitcher.  In 1995, Pichardo became the first pitcher in the American League since the advent of the designated hitter to bat twice in one game.  Pichardo had a 42-39 record with the Royals in 281 appearances.  He had 32 holds, 19 saves and a 4.48 career ERA.


#70 – Wade Davis (22) – Middle Relief Pitcher (2013-2016) – 765th Player

MPI Ranking:  1,402.28

April 5, 2013 – Started Game

October 2, 2016 – End of Game

He was nicknamed “The Silent Assassin.”  His Royals career began as a struggling starter, but was moved to the bullpen in late 2013.  There, he became one of best set-up pitchers in all of baseball.  He finished the season with an astounding 1.00 ERA.  He set the Royals team record with 32 consecutive scoreless innings of relief.  He also had 109 strikeouts for the season, breaking the relief record of 103, set by Jim York in 1971 and Greg Holland in 2013.  Davis, along with Kelvin Herrera and Greg Holland, made up the best bullpen of the major leagues.  He helped the Royals get into the playoffs for the first time in 29 years.  He was selected to the 2015 All-Star Team as a relief pitcher.  On August 1, he gave up his first home run to the Toronto Blue Jays, ending his streak of  126 2/3 innings and setting the all-time record in the category for the Royals, having not given up a home run since August 24, 2013.  He helped the Royals win the World Series in 2015.  Davis has a career 2.94 ERA in 216 appearances with the Royals.  His 51 holds is fourth all-time in franchise history.


#69 – Carlos Febles (3) – Second Base (1998-2003) – 452nd Player

MPI Ranking:  1,409.00

September 14, 1998 – Bottom of the 8th, no outs

August 10, 2003 – End of Game

In 1999, Febles became the full-time second baseman for the Royals, starting at the position on opening day.  He hit .256 with 10 home runs.  Febles was second in the American League in triples with nine on the season.  Febles, along with his teammate Carlos Beltran were known together as “Dos Carlos.”  Febles is third all-time in innings played, behind Frank White and Cookie Rojas, at second base for the Royals with 4,036 1/3.  He hit .250 with 24 home runs while in Kansas City.


#68 – Emil Brown (35) – Utility Outfield (2005-2007) – 601st Player

MPI Ranking:  1,418.86

April 6, 2005 – Started Game

September 30, 2007 – End of Game

His first season with the Royals became the best of his career.  He became the everyday right fielder, hitting .286 with 17 home runs and 86 RBIs.  In 2007, Brown was moved to left field to make room for Mark Teahen in right field.  Brown had a career batting average of .279.


#67 – Danny Jackson (25) – Starting Pitcher (1983-1987) – 200th Player

MPI Ranking:  1,444.22

September 11, 1983 – Bottom of the 6th, no outs

September 30, 1987 – End of Game

He made his major league debut with Kansas City.  By 1985, he was made a primary part of the starting rotation that helped the Royals win their first-ever World Series.  In the seventh inning of Game Five, Jackson became  the only pitcher in major league history ever to strike out three batters in an inning with nine pitches during the World Series.  Jackson’s career record with the Royals was 37-49 with a 3.69 ERA.  He started 107 games with 20 complete games and six shutouts.


#66 – Luke Hochevar (44) – Starting Pitcher (2007-2016) – 663rd Player

MPI Ranking:  1,476.83

September 8, 2007 – Top of the 7th, no outs

July 24, 2016 – End of the Top of the 7th

He made his major league debut with the Royals.  He became a part of the starting rotation in 2008.  He struggled much of his time as the ace of the starting rotations.  In 2013, he moved to the bullpen and was an integral part of the best bullpen in baseball.  He missed the 2014 season due to Tommy John Surgery, but helped the Royals to their first World Series victory in 30 years in 2015.  Hochevar has a 4.98 career ERA with a 46-65 record.  He also has 28 career holds with Kansas City.


#65 – Kurt Stillwell (1) – Shortstop (1988-1991) – 253rd Player

MPI Ranking:  1,485.93

April 4, 1988 – OPENING DAY – Started Game

October 5, 1991 – ENd of Game

Stillwell proved to be a consistent shortstop for the Royals in his first season.  He hit .251 in his first season with 10 home runs and 53 RBIs.  He was picked as a reserve player in the 1988 All-Star Game.  Stillwell continued to play well in 1989, hitting .261 with seven home runs. Stillwell is fourth all-time in innings played at shortstop with 4,197 1/3.  He is a career .256 hitter with the Royals, driving in 26 home runs and 209 RBIs while in Kansas City.


#64 – Steve Farr (26) – Closing Pitcher (1985-1990) – 219th Player

MPI Ranking:  1,487.89

August 8, 1985 – Started Game

September 28, 1990 – End of Game

Steve Farr was brought up in 1985 as a relief pitcher and spot starter, helping the Royals to the playoffs.  By 1986, he became a full-time relief pitcher.  By 1988, he was one of the top relief pitchers in the American League.  Farr finished his career eighth all-time in saves with 49 and a career ERA of 3.05.


#63 – Kelvin Herrera (40) – Middle Relief Pitcher (2011-2016) – 743rd Player

MPI Ranking:  1,492.88

September 21, 2011 – Top of the 8th, no outs

September 29, 2017 – End of the Top of the 7th

Herrera made his major league debut with Kansas City.  Herrera’s fastball averaged 97 mph and tops off at 103 mph. In 2014, he combined with Wade Davis and Greg Holland to be the most feared bullpen in the major leagues.  He recorded a 4-3 record with a 1.43 ERA.  Between mid-June and mid-September, Herrera did not give up an earned run.  He was one of the fastest pitchers in all of baseball.  He helped the Royals make it to the playoffs for the first time in 29 years. In 2015, he was selected to his first-ever All-Star Game as a relief pitcher.  That same season he broke the club record with 105 1/3 innings pitched without giving up a home run.  Herrera helped the Royals make their second playoff berth in a row in 2015.  He pitched in eight playoff games with a 1.04 ERA and helped the Royals to the World Series.  He has a career 2.86 ERA with Kansas City in 415 appearances.  Herrera has the all-time franchise record for holds with 111.


#62 – Raul Ibanez (18) – Left Field (2001-2003, 2014) – 499th Player

MPI Ranking:  1,527.52

April 2, 2001 – Top of the 9th, Two outs – 6th AB

September 28, 2014 – End of Game

Ibanez became a backup outfielder in 2001 and through the next three season, rotated to several positions for the Royals, but played nearly every game.  He was a fan favorite, but not re-signed at the end of the 2003 season.  He was acquired again in 2014 to become a mentor to the young Royals’ players.  He became the oldest player in franchise history to hit a triple and a home run.   Ibanez hit .286 in his Royals career with 57 home runs and 252 RBIs.  He played 1,497 innings in left field with Kansas City.


#61 – John Buck (14) – Catcher (2004-2009) – 584th Player

MPI Ranking:  1,551.23

June 25, 2004 – Started Game

October 4, 2009 – End of Game

He made his major league debut with the Royals.  Starting in 2005, Buck became the opening day catcher for the Royals for the next four seasons.  He was very consistent at the plate over the next two seasons, hitting .244 with 23 home runs.  Buck is fourth all-time, behind Salvador Perez, Mike Macfarlane and Brent Mayne, in innings caught for the Royals with 4,723 1/3.  He hit .235 with 70 home runs as a member of the Kansas City Royals.


#60 – Jose Offerman (30) – Second Base (1996-1998) – 392nd Player

MPI Ranking:  1,598.91

April 2, 1996 – OPENING DAY – Started Game – Bottom of the 1st, no outs

September 27, 1998 – End of Game

In Offerman’s first season, he primarily played first base while having some time at second base and shortstop.  He became a major offensive presence for the Royals, hitting .303 with 24 stolen bases.  In 1997, Offerman became the full-time second baseman for the Royals, again hitting well with a .297 batting average.  The 1998 season was by far his best, leading the American League with 13 triples.  He hit .315, stole 45 bases, and drove in 96 runs.  Offerman is sixth all-time for innings played at second base with 2,449 1/3.  He was a career .306 hitter for the Royals, the best in the history of the franchise for a player with over 1000 plate appearances.


#59 – Danny Duffy (23) – Starting Pitcher (2011-2017) – 736th Player

MPI Ranking:  1,606.04

May 18, 2011 – Started Game

September 28, 2017 – Top of the 5th, One out

Duffy made his major league debut with Kansas City.  He helped that Royals to their first playoff berth in 29 years in 2014 and helped them win the World Series in 2015.  In 2016, he had a 12-3 record in 26 starts.  In 2017, Duffy set a club record 16 games started at home without a loss.  He has a career 3.73 ERA with the Royals in 158 appearances with Kansas City with a 45-43 record.


#58 – Jim Eisenreich (22) – Utility Outfield (1987-1992) – 246th Player

MPI Ranking:  1,652.67

June 22, 1987 – Top of the 9th, Two outs

October 4, 1992 – End of Game

Jim Eisenreich was picked by the Royals up despite his retirement from baseball due to Tourette’s Syndrome.  He bounced back and forth from the minors and Kansas City until 1989, when he became a full-time utility outfielder for Kansas City.  He was chosen the Royals Player-of-the-Year that season.  He hit a career .277 for the Kansas City Royals.


#57 – Ed Kirkpatrick (8) – Catcher (1969-1973) – 1st Player

MPI Ranking:  1,667.29

First Game – April 8, 1969 – OPENING DAY – Started Game

Last Game – September 30, 1973 – End of Game

Known as “Spanky,” he was the first-ever left fielder in franchise history.  However, Kirkpatrick played the majority of his time as catcher or first baseman.  He was the last player for the Royals to have a hit in the old Municipal Stadium.  He was also the first player to play as designated hitter in 1973 and was a part of the first-ever triple play turned by the Royals.  He hit .248 with Kansas City with 56 home runs.


#56 – Marty Pattin (33) – Middle Relief Pitcher (1974-1980) – 92nd Player

MPI Ranking:  1,675.83

April 13, 1974 – Started Game

October 21, 1980 – WORLD SERIES – End of the Bottom of the 7th

Known as “Bulldog,” Pattin split his time a middle relief pitcher and starting pitcher for the Royals over the next seven years.  He posted a career 3.48 ERA and a record of 43-39 in 244 appearances.  Pattin was named American League Pitcher-of-the-Month twice in 1975.  He was normally a long-relief pitcher, but after the injury to Steve Busby in 1976, Pattin was inserted into the starting rotation.  Pattin pitched in relief in the ALCS games against the New York Yankees between 1976 and 1978.  He also pitched an inning of relief in Game Six of the 1980 World Series.  


#55 – Paul Schaal (10) – Third Base (1969-1974) – 27th Player

MPI Ranking:  1,700.76

First Game – May 2, 1969 – FIRST GAME – Started Game

Last Game – April 28, 1974 – End of the Top of the 13th

Schaal was the primary third baseman for the Kansas City Royals between 1971 and 1973.  He was the last player to hit a grand slam home run at the old Municipal Stadium.  He was a part of the first-ever triple play turned by the Royals.  He holds the franchise record for the most consecutive games started at third base.  He was replaced at third base by rookie George Brett in 1974.  He batted .263 with Kansas City


#54 – Steve Balboni (45) – First Base (1984-1988) – 201st Player

MPI Ranking:  1,734.62

April 3, 1984 – OPENING DAY – Started Game

May 22, 1988 – End of Game

“Bye Bye” Balboni was known for two things offensively:  home runs and striking out.  In his first season with the Royals, he was third in the American League in strikeouts with 139, but led the team in home runs with 28.  Between August 20 and August 22, Balboni became only the second major league player to strike out nine times during nine consecutive at bats.  In 1985, he lead the American League with 166 strikeouts and set the Royals franchise record with 36 home runs and held it for 32 years.  That season, Balboni helped the Royals win their first-ever World Series title.  He was a career .230 hitter for the Royals with 119 career home runs.  He is fifth all-time in innings played for the Royals at first base with 4,228.


#53 – Willie Aikens (24) – First Base (1980-1983) – 146th Player

MPI Ranking:  1,738.24

April 10, 1980 – OPENING DAY – Started Game

October 2, 1983 – End of Game

Willie Aikens became an impact player for the Royals after being traded by the California Angels.  He became the starting first baseman and helped the Royals to their first-ever World Series.  He is the first player to have two two-home run games in a World Series.  Unfortunately, his time in Kansas City ended with a drug arrest in 1983.  He hit .282 with 77 home runs while in Kansas City.


#52 – Angel Berroa (4) – Shortstop (2001-2007) – 515th Player

MPI Ranking:  1,750.48

September 18, 2001 – Bottom of the 7th, no outs

June 5, 2007 – End of Game

Berroa made his major league debut with the Royals.  Berroa was also caught up in a major scandal in 2002 known as “age-gate,” where many Latin American players were caught lying about their age.  Despite this, Berroa became the everyday shortstop in 2003 and became one of the best shortstops in the American League.  He was voted the American League Rookie-of-the-Year.  Berroa’s 5,315 1/3 innings at shortstop is fourth all-time for the Kansas City Royals behind Freddie Patek, Alcides Escobar and U L Washington.  He hit a career .263 for the Royals with 40 home runs and 50 stolen bases.


#51 – Bo Jackson (16) – Left Field (1986-1990) – 230th Player

MPI Ranking:  1,809.41

September 2, 1986 – Started Game

October 3, 1990 – End of Game

Exactly three months after he was drafted by Kansas City, he made his major league debut with the Royals.  Jackson was an amazing athlete at Auburn University.  He qualified for nationals in track & field, played baseball, and was the Heisman Trophy Winner in football.  In 1987, Jackson was tapped to be the opening day left fielder for the Royals.  He was also picked up by the Oakland Raiders in the NFL draft.  In 1989, Jackson became a household name through his “Bo Knows” campaign with Nike.  He was known for his exceptional strength and speed.  In his first at bat in the All-Star game, Bo Jackson hit a 448’ home run.  In 1990, Jackson ran up the outfield wall to make one of the greatest catches in major league history. During that season, he tied a major league record with four consecutive home runs in four at bats.  Bo Jackson hit .250 in his Royals career with 109 home runs and 81 stolen bases in 511 games.  Jackson is fourth all-time for innings played in left field with 2,907 2/3.  Bo Jackson is one of the most popular players in Royals history.


#50 – Wally Joyner (12) – First Base (1992-1995) – 321st Player

MPI Ranking:  1,847.09

April 6, 1992 – OPENING DAY – Started Game – Top of the 1st, 3rd AB

September 22, 1995 – End of Game

In his first season, Joyner hit .269 with nine home runs and 66 RBIs.  He was one of the top three fielding first basemen in the American League.  His second season was much improved.  Joyner hit 15 home runs and had the best batting average of any Royals starter at .292.  Joyner’s career batting average with the Royals was .293.  He hit 44 home runs and 271 RBIs while in Kansas City.  Joyner is fourth all-time in innings played at first base, behind Eric Hosmer, John Mayberry and Mike Sweeney with 4,269.  


#49 – Doug Bird (29) – Closing Pitcher (1973-1978) – 77th Player

MPI Ranking:  1,867.01

April 29, 1973 – Bottom of the 6th, One out

October 6, 1978 – American League Championship Series – Bottom of the 8th, One out

Bird made his major league debut with Kansas City in 1973.  He was considered a closer in the beginning of his career.  In 1976, he became a starter after a season-ending injury to Steve Busby.  He helped the Royals make their first playoff berth in 1976.  He had a 49-36 record with Kansas City and an ERA of 3.56.  He had 58 saves in his career and is sometimes considered the first true closer in franchise history.


#48 – John Wathan (12) – Catcher (1976-1985) – 108th Player

MPI Ranking:  1,868.88

May 26, 1976 – Top of the 8th, One out

October 26, 1985 – WORLD SERIES – End of Game

He was nicknamed “The Duke” because of his near-perfect impersonation of John Wayne.  He split time between first base and backup catcher in the beginning of his career.  He helped the Royals to two World Series’.  At first base, he set the team record at first base with 57 errorless innings.  Wathan became the primary catcher with the Royals in 1981.  In 1982, he set a major league record with the most stolen bases in a season by a catcher with 36.  He retired as a player after the 1985 season and became a bench coach for Kansas City.  Later, her would become manager.  Wathan had a .262 batting average with 105 stolen bases and 21 home runs.


#47 – Brian McRae (56) – Center Field (1990-1994) – 291st Player

MPI Ranking:  1,893.01

August 7, 1990 – Started Game

August 10, 1994 – End of Game

Brian McRae was the son of long-time Kansas City designated hitter Hal McRae and made his major league debut with the Royals.  He became one of the best fielding center fielders in the league in his rookie year.  Brian McRae is fourth all-time in innings played in center field with 5,292 1/3 innings.  He is tied for second all-time for Royals players with inside-the-park home runs with five.  He had a career .262 batting average with the Royals in his five seasons.


#46 – U L Washington (30) – Shortstop (1977-1984) – 121st Player

MPI Ranking:  1,900.17

September 6, 1977 – Top of the 7th, One out

October 5, 1984 – American League Championship Series – End of Game

U L Washington (the “U” and “L” are not short for any name) signed with the Royals in 1972.  He became the everyday shortstop in 1979 and helped the Royals to the 1980 World Series.  He became one of the few switch hitters to hit two home runs in a game from both sides of the plate in 1979.  He is third all-time for innings played at shortstop in franchise history.  He hit .254 with the Kansas City Royals.


#45 – Darrell Porter (15) – Catcher (1977-1980) – 116th Player

MPI Ranking:  1,944.10

April 9, 1977 – Started Game

October 19, 1980 – WORLD SERIES – End of Game

Porter was one of the most intense players in Royals history.  He was selected to the All-Star team three out of the four seasons he was in Kansas City.  He helped the Royals to their first-ever World Series.  Porter finished his career with the Royals with a .271 batting average with 61 home runs.


#44 – Bud Black (40) – Starting Pitcher (1982-1988) – 173rd Player

MPI Ranking:  1,951.08

April 5, 1982 – Bottom of the 8th, no outs

May 28, 1988 – End of the Top of the 7th

Bud Black became part of the starting rotation in 1983.  He was the starting pitch in the “Pine Tar Incident” game.  By 1984, he was one of the best starting pitchers in the American League.  He helped the Royals to win their first-ever World Series title in 1985.  Between 1986 and 1988, Black split time between starting and the bullpen.  Black had a 56-57 record as a Royals pitcher and a 3.73 ERA.


#43 – Jermaine Dye (24) – Right Field (1997-2001) – 407th Player

MPI Ranking:  1,982.46

April 2, 1997 – OPENING DAY – Started Game

October 7, 2001 – Top of the 6th, One out

His 1997 and 1998 seasons were disappointing, hitting only .235 with 12 home runs over that period.  He was plagued with injuries during those years.  His 1999 season was finally a healthy one for Dye and he began to shine.  He hit .295, hit 27 home runs and drove in 119 runs.  Dye led the American League in appearances in right field with 157 games.  He became extremely popular with the fans who would chant “Dye-no-mite” during his at bats.  He had an explosive start to the 2000 season, hitting .339 by the end of May.  Dye set a major league record by becoming the first player to hit over 10 home runs and 10 doubles in the first month of a season.  He was voted by the fans to be the starting right fielder in the 2000 All-Star Game in Atlanta.  Dye is second all-time in innings played in right field with 4,528 2/3, behind only Al Cowens.  He was a career .284 hitter with 85 home runs and 329 RBIs.


#42 – Lou Piniella (9) – Left Field (1969-1973) – 1st Player

MPI Ranking:  1,996.60

First Game – April 8, 1969 – OPENING DAY – Started Game

Last Game – September 22, 1973 – Bottom of the 13th, no outs

Lou Piniella was the first left-fielder in franchise history.  He is credited with having the first at bat, hit, double triple, base on balls, run scored and RBI in franchise history.  In 1969, he was the American League Rookie-of-the-Year.  He is second all-time for innings played in left field.  He hit .286 with Kansas City and was considered one of the best defensive outfielders in baseball at the time.


#41 – Tom Gordon (36) – Starting Pitcher (1988-1995) – 265th Player

MPI Ranking:  2,005.98

September 8, 1988 – Tom of the 7th, no outs

October 1, 1995 – Bottom of the 2nd, no outs

Tom “Flash” Gordon made his major league debut with the Royals.  He was runner-up for Rookie-of-the-Year in the American League in 1989.  In 1990, he pitched six complete games.  He also played a significant amount of time in the bullpen in the later years of his career in Kansas City.  Gordon had a career 4.02 ERA with the Royals and compiled a record of 79-71.  He is fifth all-time in strikeouts for the Royals with 999.


#40 – Steve Busby (40) – Starting Pitcher (1972-1980) – 71st Player

MPI Ranking:  2,044.93

September 8, 1972 – Started Game

August 26, 1980 – End of the Bottom of the 6th

Steve Busby was the first pitcher to pitch a no-hitter in franchise history in 1973.  In 1974, he became the only pitcher to accomplish the feat twice.  That same year, he became the second pitcher in franchise history to record a 20-win season.  Has selected to pitch in the All-Star Game in 1975.  His career was cut short by an injury in 1976.  In 1978, he tried a comeback and became the first pitcher a major league history to be placed on a “pitch count.”  His career ended in 1980.  He had a career 3.72 ERA and was 70-54.  He was one of the first two Kansas City players inducted into the Royals Hall of Fame.


#39 – Cookie Rojas (1) – Second Base (1970-1977) – 46th Player

MPI Ranking:  2,107.23

June 16, 1970 – Started Game

October 9, 1977 – American League Championship Series – End of Game

Rojas was a gamble for the Royals when they acquired him in 1970.  However, he quickly became the starting second baseman and revitalised his career.  He was an All-Star second baseman for four seasons with Kansas City.  He was considered one of the top defensive second basemen in the American League.  He was the first player in franchise history to hit a walk-off grand slam home run.  He helped the Royals make it to their first playoff berth in 1976.  He became a backup second baseman to a young Frank White in his later years.  He retired from baseball in 1977 and eventually was inducted into the Royals Hall of Fame.  He was a career .268 hitter with Kansas City.


#38 – Mark Teahen (24) – Third Base (2005-2009) – 597th Player

MPI Ranking:  2,109.95

April 4, 2005 – OPENING DAY – Started Game

October 4, 2009 – End of Game

Teahen made his major league debut with Kansas City as the 2005 starting third baseman.  In the opener, his first hit was a triple.  He had problems at third base defensively and was considered the worst third baseman in the American League.  In 2006, her was named Royals Player of the Year.  In 2007, the Royals moved Alex Gordon up to the major leagues.  In order to make room for Gordon at third base, Kansas City moved Teahen to right field.  However, in 2009, he was moved back to third base.  Having to switch positions constantly, Teahen was awarded the Hutch Award in 2009.  Teahen ended his Royals career hitting .269 with 59 home runs.  He is fifth all-time in innings played in right field and sixth all-time at third base.


#37 – Zack Greinke (23) – Starting Pitcher (2004-2010) – 578th Player

MPI Ranking:  2,125.60

May 22, 2004 – Started Game

September 30, 2010 – End of the Top of the 7th

He made his major league debut with Kansas City.  His arrival was much anticipated in Kansas City, although some believed that he was being brought up too early.  His first season with the Royals was average, with an ERA of 3.97 and a 8-11 record.  Greinke was very awkward in the clubhouse, so to help him, the Royals had him live with legendary third baseman George Brett.  Despite battling anxiety, Greinke would eventually win the Cy Young Award in in 2009, having the best ERA in the American League and making the All-Star team.  Greinke was 60-67 in his career with the Royals with an ERA of 3.82 with 931 career strikeouts.


#36 – Dick Drago (41) – Starting Pitcher (1969-1973) – 23rd Player

MPI Ranking:  2,245.99

First Game – April 11, 1969 – Bottom of the 3rd, One out

Last Game – September 21, 1973 – End of Game

Drago started his major league career in Kansas City and became a part of the starting rotation in the 1969 season.  He pitched for four seasons in Kansas City and was the first Royals pitcher to have a complete game victory.  In 1971, Drago was fifth in the Cy Young Award Voting.  He pitched 3.52 ERA in Kansas City with a 61-70 record.


#35 – Al Fitzmorris (39) – Starting Pitcher (1969-1976) – 39th Player

MPI Ranking:  2,247.43

First Game – September 8, 1969 – Top of the 5th, no outs

Last Game – October 3, 1976 – End of the Top of the 6th

Fitzmorris pitched for Kansas City for eight seasons.  He had a 3.48 ERA and a 70-48 record while with the Royals.  He became a part of the starting rotation in mid-1973.  In 1974, he became the only pitcher in major league history to have a complete game shutout with no walks or strikeouts.  He was acquired by the Royals in the 1968 Expansion Draft and later acquired by the Toronto Blue Jays in the 1976 Expansion Draft, making one of the few players in major league history to accomplish this feat.  Fitzmorris was instrumental in helping the Royals to their first-ever playoff berth in 1976.


#34 – Salvador Perez (13) – Catcher (2011-2017) – 742nd Player

MPI Ranking:  2,295.56

August 10, 2011 – Started Game

September 28, 2017 – End of the Top of the 3rd

Salvador Perez is the best catcher in franchise history, making his major league debut with Kansas City.  He is a five-time All-Star and won four straight Gold Gloves.  He helped the Royals make their first playoff appearance in 29 years.  In the AL Wild Card game, Perez provided the walkoff RBI hit that beat the Oakland Athletics.  In 2015, he was named the World Series MVP and helped the Royals win their second World Title.  In 2016, he won his first Silver Slugger Award.  Perez is a .272 hitter with the Royals and has the best fielding range factor of any catcher in Royals history.  He is the all-time leader for the Royals with 6,596 innings caught.


#33 – Lorenzo Cain (6) – Center Field (2011-2017) – 744th Player

MPI Ranking:  2,298.12

September 23, 2011 – Started Game

October 1, 2017 – Top of the 5th, One out

He became the opening day center fielder over Jarrod Dyson in 2013 and had a great season.  He hit .251 with 14 stolen bases and four home runs.   In 2014, Cain had the best season of his career, hitting .301 with the best batting average on the team.  Cain had 28 steals and helped Kansas City be the best base-stealing team in the major leagues.  With his speed, Cain was one of the best center fielders in the game and helped Kansas City have the best defensive team in all of baseball.  Cain helped the Royals make it to the playoffs for the first time in 29 years.  He was named the American League Championship Series MVP for his spectacular catches in the outfield as well as his .333 batting average.  He also helped the Royals win their second world title in 2015.  Cain hit .289 with the Royals and has 120 career stolen bases.  Also, his 4,307 innings played in center field places him fifth on the all-time list.


#32 – Al Cowens (18) – Right Field (1974-1979) – 91st Player

MPI Ranking:  2,303.51

April 6, 1974 – Top of the 7th, no outs

September 30, 1979 – End of Game

Cowens was a very recognizable player for the Royals with his Afro, wide sideburns and large glasses.  After the first two years of lackluster play, Cowens opened up as the best defensive right fielder in the American League.  In 1976 he won the Gold Glove and was second in the MVP voting for the American League.  He helped the Royals to their first playoff berth.  Cowens holds the Royals record for the most innings played in right field with 5,471.  He was a career .282 hitter with 80 stolen bases, 44 triples and 45 home runs.


#31 – Mike Moustakas (8) – Third Base (2011-2017) – 738th Player

MPI Ranking:  2,336.48

June 10, 2011 – Started Game

October 1, 2017 – Top of the 5th, One out

Moustakas made his major league debut with Kansas City.  Known as “Moose,” he led the American League during 2012 in complete games at third base with 143 and set a club record with 41 double plays from third base, also best in the league. That same season, he set a new franchise record with 47 straight games without an error.  He helped them to their first playoff berth in 29 years.   In 2015, he was selected to the All-Star team for the first time and helped the Royals win their second World Series title.  He missed most of the 2016 season due to injury, but was named the Comeback Player-of-the-Year for the American League in 2017 and broke the 32-year old club home run record previously held by Steve Balboni.   He was also named to his second All-Star team.  Moustakas is a .251 hitter for the Royals with 119 career home runs.  He is third all-time with 6,938 2/3 innings at third base with Kansas City.


#30 – Kevin Seitzer (33) – Third Base (1986-1991) – 231st Player

MPI Ranking:  2,378.29

September 3, 1986 – Started Game

October 4, 1991 – Top of the 7th, One out

He made his major league debut with Kansas City.  Seitzer was on the opening day roster as a first baseman in 1987.  However, before the end of April, a major change came to the Royals fielding positions.  The third baseman, George Brett, would move from his long-time position to first base, swapping with Seitzer.  His season was one of the best rookie seasons in the history of the Royals.  He led the American League in hits with 207.  He hit 15 home runs with 83 RBIs and 12 stolen bases.  Seitzer was also named to the All-Star team but lost the Rookie-of-the-Year honors to Oakland’s Mark McGwire.  Seitzer is fourth all-time in innings played at third base with 5,640 2/3.  He had a career .294 batting average with the Royals along with 265 RBIs.


#29 – Mike Macfarlane (15) – Catcher (1987-1994, 1996-1998) – 247th Player

MPI Ranking:  2,404.62

July 23, 1987 – Top of the 7th, no outs

April 5, 1998 – End of Game

Mike Macfarlane made his major league debut with Kansas City and was the first rookie starting catcher for the Royals since Ellie Rodriguez in 1969.  He was the opening day catcher in five seasons with the Royals.  After 1988, he was the primary catcher for the Royals except for the 1989 season when we was backup to Gold Glove winning Bob Boone.   Macfarlane is second all-time for being hit by a pitch with 78 in his Royals career.  He ranks in the top ten of all-time catchers in American League history with a .993 fielding percentage. Macfarlane hit .256 with the Kansas City Royals along with 103 home runs.  Macfarlane is the second all-time in franchise history  for innings played as a catcher with 6,398.


#28 – Greg Holland (56) – Closing Pitcher (2010-2015) – 717th Player

MPI Ranking:  2,410.35

August 2, 2010 – Top of the 8th, no outs

September 18, 2015 – End of Game

He made his major league debut in 2010 with the Royals.  In 2011, he became the set up pitcher to closer Joakim Soria.  He had 18 holds on the season.  He continued his setup duties in 2012 to a new closer, Jonathan Broxton, until he was traded in August.  Holland then took over the closing duties.  He became one of the top closers in baseball.  He was the American League Pitcher-of-the-Month in July of 2013 and named to the All-Star team.  In 2013, he was the Relief Pitcher-of-the-Year for the American League and set the club record with 47 saves.  Holland was the first-ever winner of the Mariano Rivera Award for the best relief pitcher in the American League.  He helped lead the Royals to their first playoff appearance in 29 years and became the first relief pitcher to earn a save in the postseason since Dan Quisenberry.  In the 2014 post-season, Holland was brilliant.  He had a 0.82 ERA with seven saves in 11 appearances.  He is fourth all-time in team saves with 145 and has a career 2.42 ERA in Kansas City.


#27 – Charlie Leibrandt (37) – Starting Pitcher (1984-1989) – 210th Player

MPI Ranking:  2,427.19

June 1, 1984 – Started Game

October 1, 1989 – End of the Bottom of the 7th

In his first season, Charlie Leibrandt posted an 11-7 record with an ERA of 3.63.  In 1985, he was one of the top five pitchers in the American League and April’s Pitcher-of-the-Month.  His 2.69 ERA was the second lowest of any starter in the league.  He was also considered one of the best fielding pitchers in the league.  He earned the nickname “Rembrandt” for his finesse masterpieces and helped the Royals win their first-ever World Series.  Leibrandt had a career 3.60 ERA with the Royals and a 76-61 record.  He is seventh all-time in innings pitched for the Royals with 1,257.  He pitched 34 complete games with 10 shutouts in his career.


#26 – Danny Tartabull (4) – Right Field (1987-1991) – 236th Player

MPI Ranking:  2,452.64

April 6, 1987 – OPENING DAY – Started Game

October 5, 1991 – End of Game

His father, Jose Tartabull, played for the old Kansas City Athletics from 1962 to 1966.  In his first season, Tartabull hit .309 with 101 RBIs.  He hit 34 home runs, just two short of the all-time season record for the Royals.  By 1991, Tartabull set the franchise record with five grand slam home runs.  That same season, he became the starting designated hitter for the American League All-Star team.  Tartabull is third all-time in innings played in right field with 4,456.  He is seventh all-time in home runs with 124.  He hit .290 while in Kansas City with 425 RBIs and 141 doubles.


#25 – Joakim Soria (48) – Closing Pitcher (2007-2011, 2016-2017) – 650th Player

MPI Ranking:  2,722.19

April 4, 2007 – Top of the 6th, One out

September 30, 2017 – End of the Top of the 8th

He was the most successful Rule 5 acquisition in Royals history.  He made his major league debut with Kansas City and was known as “The Mexecutioner.”  His 2008 season was the best of his career.  He became the closer for the Royals, pitching in 63 games and was second in the major leagues with 42 saves.  On July 15, 2008, Soria pitched for the Kansas City Royals in the All-Star Game.  He left the Royals in 2012 but returned in 2016 as a set-up pitcher.  His career ERA was 2.82 in 427 relief appearances.  He has 49 career holds.


#24 – Alcides Escobar (2) – Shortstop (2011-2017) – 723rd Player

MPI Ranking:  2,749.76

March 31, 2011 – OPENING DAY – Started Game

October 1, 2017 – Top of the 5th, One out

In his first season with the Royals, Escobar led the American League in appearances as shortstop with 156 games.  His 2014 season was one of the best of his career.  He led the major leagues in appearances as a shortstop, playing all 162 games.  He was second on the team in stolen bases with 31.  He had an excellent season in the field as a part of the best defensive team in the major leagues.  He was instrumental in helping the Royals to their first playoff berth in 29 years. In 2015, he was he became an All-Star starter. In the post-season, he became only the second player to have a leadoff home run.  He set the major league record with 15 straight postseason games with a hit as well as a major league record of seven leadoff hits in a single postseason.  He was selected the 2015 ALCS Most Valuable Player, hitting .478 with five RBIs.  He also earned a Gold Glove that season.  He set the club record with 334 consecutive starts at any position in 2017.  Escobar hit .262 for the Royals with 148 stolen bases.  He is currently second all-time for innings played as a shortstop with 9,712, only behind Freddie Patek.


#23 – Johnny Damon (18) – Center Field (1995-2000) – 385th Player

MPI Ranking:  2,811.44

August 12, 1995 – Started Game

October 1, 2000 – End of Game

He made his major league debut with Kansas City.  He was touted as the next George Brett before the season began in 1996.  Damon was the opening day center fielder for the Royals.  He hit .271 in his rookie year with six home runs and 25 stolen bases.  He also tied a Royals record with seven RBIs in a single game.  Damon was an everyday player for the Royals, but he began splitting up his time in all three outfield positions throughout the season.  By 1999, he showed great control at the plate, having 67 walks and only 50 strikeouts.  In 2000, Damon led the league with 46 stolen bases.  In 2000, he led the league with 136 runs.  Damon is seventh all-time in innings played in center field with 3,276 2/3 and seventh all-time in left field with 2,073 innings.  Damon hit .292 in his career with the Royals with 65 home runs and 156 stolen bases.  He also played over 1,000 innings in right field.


#22 – David DeJesus (9) – Center Field (2003-2010) – 560th Player

MPI Ranking:  2,894.42

September 2, 2003 – Bottom of the 8th, no outs

July 22, 2010 – Bottom of the 3rd, no outs

He began his career splitting time between center field and left field.  After hitting a grand slam in 2008, the radio announcer said, “He smashed the living DeJesus out of that ball!”  He is sixth all-time for innings player in center field and fifth all-time for innings played in left field.   He was a career .289 hitter with the Royals with 61 home runs, three of which were inside-the-park,  and 390 RBIs.


#21 – Joe Randa (16) – Third Base (1995-1996, 1999-2004) – 369th Player

MPI Ranking:  3,091.99

April 30, 1995 – Started Game

October 3, 2004 – End of Game

Joe Randa had his major league debut with Kansas City.  He earned the nickname “The Joker” because of his continuous smile during games.  He had an outstanding rookie season with a .303 batting average and six home runs.  After two seasons, he was traded to Pittsburgh.  Randa returned in 1999 to have the best season of his career.  Hit hit .314 with 16 home runs and 84 RBIs.  Between June 8 and June 12, Randa set a club-record 10 consecutive hits.  He was one of the top fielding third baseman in the American League.  Randa is eighth all-time in hits with the Royals with 1,084 and tenth in games played with 1,019.  Randa is second only to George Brett in innings played at third base with 7,953 2/3.  Randa is one of the best third basemen in Royals history.


#20 – John Mayberry (7) – First Base (1972-1977) – 63rd Player

MPI Ranking:  3,140.62

April 15, 1972 – OPENING DAY – Started Game

October 8, 1974 – American League Championship Series – End of the Top of the 4th

John Mayberry one of the best power hitters in Royals history.  Known as “Big John,” Mayberry was twice picked to play in the All-Star Game.  He was considered one of the best fielding first basemen in baseball for his time.  He drew more walks than strikeouts in five of his six seasons in Kansas City.  He was the first player in franchise history to play a complete game in the All-Star Game.  In 1975, Mayberry came in second in the American League MVP voting.  He helped the Royals to their first-ever playoff berth in 1976.  He is second only to Eric Hosmer for innings played at first base.  He hit 143 home runs in six season with a .261 batting average.  He was inducted into the Royals Hall of Fame.


#19 – Freddie Patek (2) – Shortstop (1971-1979) – 52nd Player

MPI Ranking:  3,169.65

April 6, 1971 – OPENING DAY – Started Game

September 14, 1979 – End of the Top of the 9th

Known as “The Flea,” Patek was the smallest major league baseball player of his time at 5’4” and 148lbs. He was selected to the All-Star team three times.  Patek was the first Royals player ever to hit for the cycle in 1971.  He helped the Royals to their first playoff berth in 1976.  Hall of Fame manager Whitey Herzog one said that Patek was the greatest shortstop on artificial turf.  He played more innings as shortstop than any other player in franchise history.  He had 30 or more stolen bases for eight straight seasons.  He was elected to the Royals Hall of Fame in 1992.


#18 – Carlos Beltran (15) – Center Field (1998-2004) – 451st Player

MPI Ranking:  3,170.85

September 14, 1998 – Top of the 7th, no outs

June 24, 2004 – End of the Top of the 8th

Beltran made his major league debut with Kansas City in 1998.  The next season, he was the leadoff center fielder on Opening Day.  He hit .293 in his rookie season with 194 hits, 22 home runs and 108 RBIs, leading the American League with 150 complete games at center field.  Beltran was selected as the American League Rookie-of-the-Year.  During his time in Kansas City, Beltran hit four grand slam home runs.  He is the only Royals player in history to hit two home runs from both sides of the plate twice while in Kansas City.  He was selected to the All-Star team in 2004, but was traded shortly before the game.  He ended up playing for the National League, making him the only major league player selected to play on one league’s All-Star team and actually play for the other.  Beltran was a career .300 hitter for the Royals with 123 home runs, 516 RBIs, 45 triples and 164 stolen bases.  He became one of the greatest center fielders in Royals history and his 6,545 1/3 innings there makes him third all-time in franchise history.


#17 – Larry Gura (32) – Starting Pitcher (1976-1985) – 107th Player

MPI Ranking:  3,233.90

May 22, 1976 – Bottom of the 8th, no outs

May 3, 1985 – End of Game

Gura was traded to the Royals in 1976 and helped them to their first-ever playoff berth.  He became one of the top starting pitchers for the club and helped them to the 1980 World Series.  He was selected to the 1980 All-Star team.  He had one of the best fielding percentages of any pitcher in the American League.  He had a 111-78 career record, 3.72 ERA, 12 saves and seven holds with Kansas City.  Larry Gura was inducted into the Royals Hall of Fame in 1992.


#16 – Eric Hosmer (35) – First Base (2011-2017) – 733rd Player

MPI Ranking:  3,361.64

May 6, 2011 – Started Game

October 1, 2017 – Top of the 5th, One out

He made his major league debut with Kansas City.  Hosmer is the all-time leader in innings played at first base with 8,950 1/3 innings.  He is a four-time Gold Glove winner.  He helped lead the Royals to their first playoff appearance in 29 years in 2014.   In 2015, Hosmer became one of the most offensively reliable players on the team.  He hit .297 with 18 home runs and a career-high 93 RBIs.  He helped the Royals to their second World Series berth in a row.   Hosmer was named as the starting first baseman to the American League All-Star team and hit a home run during the game.  He was named the Most Valuable Player of the game, the first time a Royals player had the honor since Bo Jackson in 1989.  He has a career .284 batting average with Kansas City.


#15 – Bret Saberhagen (18) – Starting Pitcher (1984-1991) – 203rd Player

MPI Ranking:  3,454.22

April 4, 1984 – Bottom of the 4th, One out

October 2, 1991 – End of the Top of the 2nd

He made his major league debut with the Royals in 1984.  He would become one of the best starting pitchers in franchise history.  In 1985, Saberhagen became a full-time starter for the Royals.  In that season, Saberhagen became only the fourth pitcher in franchise history to win at least 20 games in a season.  He had a 2.87 ERA with 158 strikeouts. He had the the lowest WHIP of any pitcher in the league. He helped the Royals win their first-ever World Series and was the series MVP.  He also won his first Cy Young Award that season.  In 1987, he became the first starting pitcher since Steve Busby in 1975 to pitch in the All-Star Game.  To date, he is the only Royals pitcher to start an All-Star Game.  The 1989 season proved to be the best of his career.  Saberhagen won a club-record 23 wins in the season, the best in the American League.  He was first in the league in innings pitched, WHIP, and complete games.  He won his second Cy Young award with 99% of the vote.  Saberhagen is third all-time in complete games with 64 and fourth all-time in shutouts with 14.  His career ERA of 3.21 is one of the best of a starting pitcher in Royals history.  He pitched the fourth no-hitter in franchise history in 1991.  He was inducted into the Royals Hall of Fame in 2005.


#14 – Billy Butler (16) – Designated Hitter (2007-2014) – 655th Player

MPI Ranking:  3,577.88

May 1, 2007 – Started Game

October 29, 2014 – WORLD SERIES – End of Game

Billy Butler was a first-round draft choice by the Kansas City Royals in 2004.  Butler played primarily as a designated hitter and first baseman.  In 2011, Butler won the Hutch Award for fighting spirit and competitive desire having to play both positions.  He also earned the nickname “Country Breakfast” by the fans.  Butler also won the Outstanding Designated Hitter Award for 2012, hitting .313 with 29 home runs and a trip to the All-Star Game.  Butler helped lead the Royals to their first playoff appearance in 29 years.  He shined in the postseason, hitting .263 and driving in eight runs.  Butler is second all-time in plate appearances as a designated hitter with 3,069.  He is also eighth all-time for innings played at first base.  He had a .295 batting average with 127 home runs and 628 RBIs while in Kansas City.   


#13 – Kevin Appier (55) – Starting Pitcher (1989-1999, 2003-2004) – 272nd Player

MPI Ranking:  3,623.72

June 4, 1989 – Started Game

April 23, 2004 – Top of the 2nd, no outs

Appier made his major league debut with Kansas City in 1989.  By the end of his rookie year, he had the fourth best ERA in the American League at 2.76, the lowest by a rookie starting pitcher since 1976.  He was named Rookie Pitcher-of-the-Year.   In 1991, Appier pitched two consecutive shutouts. He was a part of the best starting duo in the American League in 19984 with Cy Young Award-winning David Cone.  In 1995, he was picked to his only All-Star Game.  Although traded in 1999, he returned in 2003 to pitch parts of two more seasons.  Appier is fourth all-time in Royals history for innings pitched with 1,843 2/3.  He had 32 complete games with 10 shutouts in his career.  He holds the team record for strikeouts with 1,458, 92 more strikeouts than the next pitcher.  His overall record was 115-92 and is fourth all-time in wins.  Despite not having the accolades of other pitchers of his era, Appier is now considered to be one of the greatest pitchers of the latter half of the 20th Century.  In 2011, Kevin Appier was elected to the Kansas City Royals Hall of Fame.  


#12 – Dennis Leonard (22) – Starting Pitcher (1974-1986) – 96th Player

MPI Ranking:  3,933.97

September 4, 1974 – Top of the 7th, no outs

September 27, 1986 – SECOND GAME – Top of the 2nd, One out

He made his major league debut in 1974 and would play his entire career in Kansas City.  In his rookie season of 1975, Leonard had the third best win-loss record in the American League at 15-7  In 1976, Leonard led the team in wins with 17 and pitched 16 complete games.  He helped the Royals clinch their first-ever playoff berth against the New York Yankees.  He also helped the Royals to their first-ever World Series in 1980.  Leonard had three 20-win seasons.  Unfortunately, he suffered a severe injury in 1983 and would not come back fully until 1986.  For his efforts in the comeback, Leonard  was given the Hutch Award that season.  Leonard holds the record for the most complete games in Royals history with 103 and shutouts with 23.  He had a career 3.70 ERA and a 144-106 record.  Dennis Leonard was inducted into the Royals Hall of Fame in 1989.


#11 – Mark Gubicza (23) – Starting Pitcher (1984-1996) – 205th Player

MPI Ranking:  3,963.77

April 6, 1984 – Started Game

July 5, 1996 – End of the Top of the 1st

Mark Gubicza made his major league debut with Kansas City.  In 1985, he had his first winning season with a 14-10 record in 28 starts.  He made one start in two appearances in the 1985 ALCS against the Toronto Blue Jays with a 3.24 ERA.  However, manager Dick Howser opted to have a four-man starting  rotation in the World Series and Gubicza did not appear.  In 1986, he led the American League with the fewest home runs given up by a starting pitcher.  His best year came in 1988 when he became only the fourth pitcher to win 20 games in a season (Bret Saberhagen would repeat the feat in 1989).  He had an astounding 2.70 ERA with 183 strikeouts.  He became one of the top pitchers in the American League during the season and was selected to the 1988 All-Star Game.  In 1991, he had rotator cuff surgery and was placed in the bullpen.  Gubicza is second all-time, behind Paul Splittorff, in innings pitched with 2,218 2/3.  His career ERA was 3.91.  He pitched 42 complete games with the Royals with 16 shutouts.  He is third all-time in wins for the Royals with 132.  He was one of the best fielding pitchers in baseball, four times having the best fielding percentage of an American League starter.  In 1988, he finished third in the Cy Young Award voting.  In 2006, Gubicza was inducted into the Royals Hall of Fame.


#10 – Alex Gordon (4) – Left Field (2007-2017) – 645th Player

MPI Ranking:  4,250.81

April 2, 2007 – OPENING DAY – Started Game

October 1, 2017 – End of the Top of the 5th

Gordon was the Golden Spikes Award winner in 2005 as the top collegiate baseball player and named Minor League Player of the Year in 2006.  Gordon made his major league debut as a third baseman in 2007.  He had the worst fielding percentage of any third baseman in the American League and he he led the club for the second year in a row in strikeouts. He was demoted to AAA Omaha here he remade himself into one of the best left fielders of the 21st century.  He was chosen to three All-Star Games and was a five-time Gold Glove winner in left field.  In  2014, Gordon was the coveted Hutch Award for fighting spirit and competitive desire and helped the club to its first World Series in 29 years.  In 2015, he helped the Royals win their first World Series in 30 years.  Gordon is hitting .259 as a member of the Kansas City Royals and has played more innings in left field than any other player.


#9 – Paul Splittorff (34) – Starting Pitcher (1970-1984) – 51st Player

MPI Ranking:  4,285.07

September 23, 1970 – Started Game

June 26, 1984 – FIRST GAME – Top of the 5th, Two outs

Splittorff was the first pitcher in franchise history to earn 20 wins in a season.  He was considered the best fielding pitcher in the American League early in his career.  He helped the Royals to their first playoff berth in 1976 and their first World Series in 1980.  He pitched more innings than any other pitcher in franchise history and faced over 10,000 batters.  His career record was 166-143 with a 3.81 ERA.  He was inducted into the Royals Hall of Fame in 1987.


#8 – Dan Quisenberry (29) – Closing Pitcher (1979-1988) – 140th Player

MPI Ranking:  4,299.58

July 8, 1979 – Top of the 7th, One out

June 24, 1988 – End of the Bottom of the 6th

Quisenberry was one of the first great closers in baseball history.  As a submarine pitcher, Quisenberry helped the Royals to their first two World Series’.  He was picked for the All-Star team three times and became the first relief pitcher to win the American League Rolaids Relief Award.  In 1983, he set the major league record for saves in a season with 45.  In became the first major league pitcher to have two-consecutive 40-save seasons in a row.  He is second all-time in saves to Jeff Montgomery with 238.  He had a career 51-44 record with a 2.55 ERA.  He was inducted into the Royals Hall of Fame.


#7 – Mike Sweeney (29) – First Base (1995-2007) – 389th Player

MPI Ranking:  4,439.42

September 4, 1995 – FIRST GAME – Top of the 8th, no outs

September 30, 2007 – Top of the 7th, One out

He made his major league debut with Kansas City.  Sweeney was known as a deeply religious man and had a reputation as one of the nicest players in baseball. He began his career playing catcher.  By 1999, he was made first baseman after the retirement of Jeff King.  As first baseman, he had the best fielding percentage at the position in over 20 years for the Royals.  He led the team with a .322 batting average and was second in the American League in doubles with 44.  He was selected to the All-Star team five times in his career.  In 2002, Sweeney’s .340 batting average was the highest season batting average in Royals history next to George Brett in 1980.  Toward the end of his Royals career, he began playing more at designated hitter.  In 2006, he became only the second Royals player ever to win the Hutch Award, given to a major league player who ”best exemplifies the fighting spirit and competitive desire.”  Mike Sweeney is one of the best players in Royals history.  He hit more than 20 home runs for six seasons and hit over .300 in five seasons.  Sweeney is sixth all-time in at bats and games played, hitting .299 in his career.  He is second all-time in home runs, only to George Brett, with 197.  He is third all-time in games as a designated hitter and third all-time in innings player at first base with 4,717.  In 2015, Sweeney was inducted into the Royals Hall of Fame.


#6 – Jeff Montgomery (21) – Closing Pitcher (1988-1999) – 259th Player

MPI Ranking:  4,620.54

June 4, 1988 – Top of the 8th, One out

October 2, 1999 – End of Game

In 1988, Montgomery was a setup pitcher for closer Steve Farr.  By the next season, he had secured the closer’s role.  He made 73 appearances in 1990 and became only the 23rd pitcher in major league history to strike out three batters in an inning on nine pitches.  He became a three-time All-Star relief pitcher and tied the club record (at the time) with 45 saves in 1993.  That season he was named the American League Rolaids Relief Awards winner.  Montgomery pitched in more games than any other Royals pitcher in history with 686 appearances.  He is the all-time saves leader for the Royals with 304 in 543 game finishes.  Despite having a win-loss record of 44-50, his ERA of 3.20 is one of the best in Royals history.  In 2003, Montgomery was inducted into the Royals Hall of Fame.


#5 – Willie Wilson (6) – Center Field (1976-1990) – 112th Player

MPI Ranking:  5,277.45

September 4, 1976 – Top of the 9th, no outs

October 3, 1990 – End of Game

When he first appeared in the major leagues, Willie Wilson was called the fastest man ever to play baseball.  He became an everyday left fielder in 1979 and also became the  first Royals player to hit two home runs in a game from both sides of the plate against the Milwaukee Brewers.  In 1980, he set the major league record with 705 at bats in a single season.  Wilson also se t the major league record, at the time, of 28 consecutive stolen bases.  He helped the Royals to two World Series.  In 1982, Wilson won the American League Batting Title by hitting .332 for the season and lead the league in triples with 15.  Wilson had 612 stolen bases in Royals history, placing him 12th in the major leagues since World War II.  Wilson is second all-time in triples with 133.  He has a Royals-record 11 inside-the-park home runs.  Wilson was inducted in the the Royals Hall of Fame in 2000.


#4 – Frank White (20) – Second Base (1973-1990) – 78th Player

MPI Ranking:  5,310.25

June 12, 1973 – Top of the 6th, no outs

September 30, 1990 – End of the Bottom of the 8th

Frank White is the greatest second baseman in franchise history.  He played his entire 18-year career with the Royals.  He took over the at second base in 1976 and helped the Royals to their first playoff berth in franchise history.  He was a five-time All-Star and was considered one of the best fielding second basemen of the modern era of baseball.  He won a franchise-record eight Gold Gloves.  He was instrumental in helping the Royals to two World Series, winning the ALCS MVP in 1980.  He hit four grand slam home runs with the Royals and also won the Silver Slugger Award in 1986.  He was inducted into the Royals Hall of Fame and his #20 jersey was retired by the club.


#3 – Hal McRae (11) – Designated Hitter (1973-1987) – 72nd Player

MPI Ranking:  5,636.94

April 6, 1973 – OPENING DAY – Started Game

July 17, 1987 – Bottom of the 8th, One out

Hal McRae is one of the greatest designated hitters in baseball history.  In his first full season with Kansas City, he played about 60% of the games in right field.  After his first season, he became the everyday designated hitter.  In 1976, he was second in the American League in batting average by less than .001.  He was selected to the All-Star team three times, helped the Royals to their first playoff berth in 1976, and helped the Royals in two World Series’.  After his major league career ended, he became the manager for the Royals for four season and was inducted into the Royals Hall of Fame.  He had .293 batting average with the Royals.


#2 – Amos Otis (26) – Center Field (1970-1983) – 40th Player

MPI Ranking:  6,124.43

First Game – April 7, 1970 – OPENING DAY – Started Game

Last Game – September 10, 1983 – End of the Bottom of the 7th

Considered the first superstar baseball player in Royals history.  Was a leader in the American League throughout the 1970s in stolen bases, doubles and triples.  Otis was named to the American League All-Star team five times and was a three-time Gold Glove winner.  He was the first player in franchise history to have a hit in the new Royals Stadium in 1973.  In 1971, he stole five bases in one game, one shy of the major league record.  He also set the major league record, for the time, in stolen base percentage with 52 out of 60 attempts successful.  Helped the Royals to their first-ever World Series in 1980.  He had five inside-the-park home runs with the Royals.  He is the all-time leader for innings played in center field.  He was inducted into the Royals Hall of Fame in 1986.


#1 – George Brett (5) – Third Base (1973-1993) – 83rd Player

MPI Ranking:  9,437.76

August 2, 1973 – Started Game

October 3, 1993 – End of Game

George Brett is the greatest baseball player in Kansas City history and one of the greatest in the history of baseball.  Brett played his entire 21 year career with the Kansas City Royals.  Brett won the American League MVP and Hutch Awards in 1980, was named the 1985 ALCS MVP and came in second in the AL MVP Award in 1976 and in 1985.  Brett won the Silver Sluggers Award for third base in 1980 and 1985 and won the award for first base in 1988.  Brett won his only Gold Glove Award in 1985 for third base.  In 1986, Brett won the coveted Lou Gehrig Memorial Award for character and integrity on and off the field.  He is the only player in baseball history to win the batting title in three different decades.  He is a part of baseball lore when he was the center figure in the “Pine Tar Incident.”  He had over 3,000 hits in his career.  He holds numerous records with Kansas City.  He was the closest player to hitting .400 since Ted Williams did it in 1941.  Brett was a patient batter who had a career 1,096 walks with 908 strikeouts.  George Brett had 2,044 hits as a third baseman, the second-most in major league history next to Wade Boggs.  In 1994, he was inducted into the Royals Hall of Fame and his jersey #5 was retire.  In 1999, he was inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame in Cooperstown, New York by the fifth highest vote margin in history.  Brett is the face and spirit of the Kansas City Royals.