Ranking the Royals: All-Star Game History for the Royals

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On July 12, 2016, the Royals sent representatives to play on the American League All-Star team for the 48th time in franchise history. There have been some great moments from Royals players at the Midsummer Classic.

Here are some facts about the Royals in All-Star history:

  • There have been 48 Royals players selected to the All-Star Team
  • 18 of the 48 have been pitchers
  • 10 of the 18 pitchers have been starters
  • Only nine players have been selected to start an All-Star Game
  • George Brett has the record for the most All-Star Game selections with 13 (11 at third base and two at first base)
  • The most Royals players in history to be on an All-Star Team was seven (2015)
  • Royals All-Star hitters have a .234 batting average (22 for 94) and a .298 OBP in the midsummer classic, with eight doubles, one triple, six home runs and 17 RBIs.  They have drawn nine walks and struck out 19 times.  There have been three stolen bases.
  • Royals All-Star pitchers have pitched 26 2/3 innings with a 2.70 ERA, giving up one home run and 25 hits.  They collectively have a 2-0 record with five holds.  No Royals pitcher has ever earned a save.
  • No Royals player has ever committed an error in the field during an All-Star Game.
  • Bret Saberhagen is the only pitcher to have ever started an All-Star Game in 1987.
  • Darrell Porter and Salvador Perez have been the only two catchers in All-Star history, catching a total of 25 innings.  Perez started in all three of his appearances while Porter started in one.
  • John Mayberry, Mike Sweeney and Eric Hosmer have been the only first basemen.  They played 22 innings.  Mayberry and Hosmer are the only two that have started.
  • Cookie Rojas and Frank White have been the only two second basemen in Royals history.  They played 30 2/3 innings.  White started in one All-Star game.  
  • George Brett, Kevin Seitzer and Mike Moustakas are the only third basemen in Royals history.  They played 65 innings.  Brett made nine appearances in the All-Star Game in the field, nine of which as a starter.
  • Freddie Patek, Kurt Stillwell and Alcides Escobar have been the only shortstops in history.  They played 16 innings.  Patek and Escobar have been the only two starters.
  • Bo Jackson and Alex Gordon have been the only two left fielders in history.  They played only nine innings.  Jackson is the only player to have started.
  • Amos Otis and Willie Wilson have been the only center fielders in history.  They played 18 2/3 innings.  Otis is the only player to have started.
  • Richie Scheinblum, Jermaine Dye and Lorenzo Cain have been the only three right fielders.  They played 12 1/3 innings.  Both Cain and Dye have started.
  • Danny Tartabull and Mike Sweeney have been the only two players to have been designated hitters in an All-Star Game.  Tartabull is the only one picked as a starter.
  • John Mayberry (1973), George Brett (1978, 1983), and Freddie Patek (1978) are the only players in franchise history to have played a complete game in the All-Star Game.

Now, here is a brief history of the All-Star Games for Royals players:

1969 – July 23 – Hosted by the Washington Senators (AL)
Catcher was the first player in franchise history to be picked to an All-Star Game and the sole representative of the Royals in 1969. He did not play.

1970 – July 14 – Hosted by the Cincinnati Reds (NL)
Centerfielder Amos Otis was the sole representative of the Royals. He became the first Royals player to receive playing time in the game. He played 5 2/3 innings in relief of first baseman Boog Powell. Carl Yastrzemski moved from center field to first base. Otis went 0-3 batting and had three putouts in center field. He was involved in one of the most memorable moments in All-Star history. The game went 17 innings. With Pete Rose at second base, Cubs’ second baseman Jim Hickman hit a single to shallow center field. Otis threw the ball to to Cleveland catcher Ray Fosse as Pete Rose scored the winning run to end the game 5-4 in favor of the National League. Fosse had his collar bone broke in the collision. This was also the first All-Star Game since 1957 in which fans were able to vote for the starters.

1971 – July 13 – Hosted by the Detroit Tigers (AL)
Center Fielder Amos Otis and second baseman Cookie Rojas were both picked as reserves for the All-Star Game. Rojas was 0-1 and played four innings in place of starter Rod Carew. Otis replaced pinch hitter Frank Howard in the batting order and took the Yankees Bobby Murcer’s spot in center field. He was 0-1 and played one inning in the field.

1972 – July 25 – Hosted by the Atlanta Braves (NL)
The Kansas City Royals had five representatives on the All-Star team this season, a club record until 2015. Amos Otis, Freddie Patek, Lou Piniella, Cookie Rojas and Richie Scheinblum were all selected as reserves. Richie Scheinblum was the first to enter the game as a defensive replacement for Yankees centerfielder Bobby Murcer, playing right field. He played 4 1/3 inning in right field with no fielding opportunities and was 0-1 at bat. Cookie Rojas pinch hit for Rod Carew in the eighth inning, hitting a two-run home run off of Montreal’s Ron Stoneman, scoring Carlton Fisk and putting the American League up 3-2. The National League would tie the game in the bottom of the ninth inning and Lou Piniella came into the game to pinch hit for Chicago pitcher Wilbur Wood, grounding out. Otis and Patek did not play in the game that went 10 innings with the American League losing 4-3.

1973 – July 24 – Hosted by the Kansas City Royals (AL)
This was the first All-Star Game hosted by the Kansas City Royals. It was the inaugural year of the new Royals Stadium (later named Kauffman Stadium). Amos Otis became the first elected starter in franchise history in center field. Chicago’s Dick Allen was elected to play first base, but was injured and John Mayberry was chosen to start in his place. Cookie Rojas was picked as a reserve player. Amos Otis went 2-2, both singles, and four innings in center field. He had no opportunities to field in the game. Mayberry became the first Royals player to have a complete game in the All-Star Game, playing all nine innings at first base. He was 1-3 with a double in the game. Rojas replaced Rod Carew at second base in the sixth inning. Rojas was 0-1 and played four innings in the field. The American League lost the game 7-1.

1974 – July 23 – Hosted by the Pittsburgh Pirates (NL)
John Mayberry and Cookie Rojas were both picked as reserves for the American League. Rojas did not play and John Mayberry pinch hit for Brooks Robinson in the eighth inning, grounding out.

1975 – July 15 – Hosted by the Milwaukee Brewers (AL)
Steve Busby became the first pitcher in franchise history selected to the All-Star Game. Hal McRae was also selected as a reserve outfielder. Busby was brought into the game in relief of Oakland starter Vida Blue in the top of the third inning. He gave up four hits, committed a balk, and gave up a run before being replaced by Mike Hargrove as a pinch hitter in the fourth inning. McRae was brought into the game to pinch hit for Yankees relief pitcher Goose Gossage in the bottom of the ninth, grounding out. The American League lost the game 6-3.

1976 – July 13 – Hosted by the Philadelphia Phillies (NL)
George Brett became the second Royals player voted by the fans to start for the American League at third base. He was joined by Amos Otis and Hal McRae, both reserve outfielders. Brett played five innings at third base and had one assist in the field. He was 0-2 with a walk at bat before being replaced by Milwaukee’s Don Money. Hal McRae pinch hit for Mark Fidrych in the top of the third inning, grounding out. Otis pinch hit for center fielder Fred Lynn in the top of the ninth inning and struck out, ending the game with the American League losing (again) by the score of 7-1.

1977 – July 19 – Hosted by the New York Yankees (AL)
Despite the Royals having one of the best records in the American League and being returning American League West Champions at the time of the All-Star Game, George Brett was the sole representative for Kansas City. Some say it was Yankees manager Billy Martin’s dislike of the Royals that led to the exclusion of some of the Royals’ best players. George Brett was voted in as a starter for the American League. He was 0-2 with a walk batting third in the lineup. He was replaced by Boston pitcher Bill Campbell in the lineup and by Graig Nettles in the field.

1978 – July 11 – Hosted by the San Diego Padres (NL)
For the first time in franchise history, the Royals had two players selected to start in the All-Star Game. George Brett was selected to his third All-Star game at third base and Freddie Patek was selected to start at shortstop. Catcher Darrell Porter and second baseman Frank White were selected as reserves. George Brett became only the second player in franchise history to play a complete game in the midsummer classic. He was 2-3 with a double, two RBIs and a run scored. He also had a sacrifice fly. Patek only played two innings, going 0-2 with a strikeout. Frank White replaced Don Money in the fourth inning, playing five innings in the field and going 0-1 at bat. Darrell Porter pinch hit for White in the bottom of the ninth, hitting a foul out ending the game with National League winning (again) 7-3.

1979 – July 17 – Hosted by the Seattle Mariners (AL)
The Royals had three players elected to start in the All-Star game, the most in franchise history. George Brett was elected for his fourth straight time at third base. Frank White was selected for this first start at second base and Darrell Porter was selected for his first time to start at catcher. Brett played six innings, going 0-3 with a walk before being replaced by Graig Nettles of the Yankees. White was 0-2 and played six innings at second base before being replaced by Bruce Bochte. Porter was 1-3 with a double and played six innings before being replaced by Brian Downing of the California Angels. Porter caught for California starter Nolan Ryan, Boston’s Bob Stanley, and California’s Mark Clear.

1980 – July 8 – Hosted by the Los Angeles Dodgers (NL)
For the first time in four years, the Royals did not have a starter. George Brett was selected to the team, but did not play because of an injury sustained on June 10. He was batting .337. Larry Gura was selected to his first All-Star Game, but also did not play. Darrell Porter was selected as a reserve catcher and replaced starter Carlton Fisk in the fifth inning. He was 0-1 in three innings as catcher. He caught for New York’s Tommy John, Chicago’s Ed Farmer, and Toronto’s Dave Stieb. There had been bad blood between the Royals and Ed Farmer because he hit Al Cowens with a pitch on May 8, 1979, fracturing his jaw and breaking some teeth. In the same game, he hit Frank White, breaking his wrist. Cowens and White missed 21 and 33 games, respectively.

1981 – August 9 – Hosted by the Cleveland Indians (AL)
This was the latest All-Star Game in history due to the baseball strike. George Brett was selected for his fifth start of his career and Frank White was picked as a reserve player. Brett played five innings, going 0-3 with two strikeouts before being replaced by Buddy Bell at third base. Frank White was brought into the game to pinch run for Milwaukee’s Ted Simmons. He then replaced New York’s Willie Randolph at second base. White played three innings and was 0-1 in the game. The National League won the game 5-4. Royals manager Jim Frey became the first Kansas City manager to lead the American League. He was fired only a could of weeks later and replaced by Dick Howser.

1982 – July 13 – Hosted by the Montreal Expos (NL)
George Brett was selected to start his sixth All-Star game at third base. He was joined by reserve players Frank White and Willie Wilson. Dan Quisenberry became the first relief pitcher in Royals history selected to an All-Star Game. Brett was 2-2, both singles, in four innings before being replaced by Buddy Bell. Wilson replaced starter Fred Lynn in center field and played five innings, going 0-2 with a strikeout while batting. Frank White replaced Bobby Grinch in the bottom of the sixth inning at second base, played three innings and was 0-1 at bat. Dan Quisenberry was brought at the same time to pitch the sixth inning. He gave up a double, a RBI single and struck out one. The National League won (again) 4-1.

1983 – July 6 – Hosted by the Chicago White Sox (AL)
George Brett was selected to start his seventh All-Star Game at third base and was joined by reserve players Willie Wilson and Dan Quisenberry. Brett would play his second-ever complete game at third base for the American League. Brett had a sacrifice fly off of National League starter Mario Soto of the Reds in the first inning, scoring Rod Carew. He then had a triple in the third inning off of Giants pitcher (and former Royals pitcher) Atlee Hammaker. Brett would score on the next at bat off a single from Dave Winfield. In the eighth inning, Brett had a double off of Lee Smith and would later score in the inning off a sacrifice fly from Lou Whitaker. In all, Brett was 2-4 in the game, striking out once. Willie Wilson came into the game in the bottom of the seventh inning in place of Fred Lynn. He played the final three innings of the game at center field and was 1-1 with an RBI double off of Atlanta’s Pascual Perez, scoring Lou Whitaker. Dan Quisenberry was brought into the ninth inning, giving up one single and striking out one to end the game. The American League won by the score of 13-3. It was only the second All-Star Game since 1963 that the American League had won the game.

1984 – July 10 – Hosted by the San Francisco Giants (NL)
George Brett was selected to start his eighth All-Star Game at third base. He played six innings at third base. In his first at bat, Brett hit a solo home run off of National League starter Charlie Lea of the Montreal Expos. He was replaced in the batting order by Oakland pitcher Bill Caudell and in the field by Cleveland third baseman Buddy Bell. Dan Quisenberry was also selected to the All-Star Team, but did not pitch.

1985 – July 16 – Hosted by the Minnesota Twins (AL)
George Brett was the sole representative of the Kansas City Royals and selected to start in this ninth All-Star Game. He played six innings at third base during the game. In his first plate appearance, Brett hit a sacrifice fly to score Ricky Henderson off of National League starter LaMarr Hoyt of the San Diego Padres. He was 0-3 with a walk and one RBI. It would be Brett’s last All-Star Game at third base.

1986 – July 15 – Hosted by the Houston Astros (NL)
George Brett and Frank White were both picked as reserves for the All-Star Game in 1986. Brett declined to play due to an injury prior to the game. Frank White came in as a pinch hitter for Lou Whittaker in the seventh inning and hit a solo home run off of Astros pitcher Mike Scott. White was 1-2 in the game, playing three innings at second base. It would be Frank White’s last All-Star Game. Seitzer came into the game in the sixth inning, replacing New York’s Don Mattingly in the lineup and replaced Wade Boggs at third base. He played the last six innings of the game, batting 0-2. The American League won the game 3-2 and Dick Howser became the first manager in franchise history to lead the American League to a win in the midsummer classice.

1987 – July 14 – Hosted by the Oakland Athletics (AL)
Bret Saberhagen became the first pitcher in Royals history to be tapped to start an All-Star Game. He was joined by George Brett and Kevin Seitzer as reserve players. For Brett, it was his first time picked to the All-Star Game for his efforts at first base, but did not play. Saberhagen pitched the first three innings of the game, giving up a double to Montreal’s Andre Dawson. He left the game with the score 0-0, being replaced by Detroit’s Jack Morris. Seitzer was picked in his rookie year to play at third base. The National League won 2-0 in 13 innings.

1988 – July 12 – Hosted by the Cincinnati Reds (NL)
George Brett, Kurt Stillwell, and Mark Gubicza were all selected as reserves to the All-Star Team in 1988. Gubicza came in the game in relief in the fourth inning to replace Roger Clemons. He pitched two innings, giving up one run on a wild pitch to Chicago’s Andre Dawson, scoring Atlanta’s Vince Coleman. He was replaced by Toronto’s Dave Stieb. Brett came into the game in the ninth inning as a pinch hitter for Milwaukee pitcher Dan Plesac, flying out. Stillwell replaced Brett in the bottom of the ninth and played one inning at shortstop and did not have a plate appearance. The American League won the game 2-1. Because of the altered rules of the All-Star Game at the time, Gubicza was credited with a hold and not the win. Minnesota’s Frank Viola earned the victory despite only pitching the first two innings. In a regular game, Gubicza would have earned the victory due to pitching the fifth inning.

1989 – July 11 – Hosted by the California Angels (AL)
Bo Jackson was selected by the fans to start the 1989 All-Star Game in left field. Mark Gubicza was also selected as a reserve pitcher for the American League. Jackson had one of the most memorable moments in All-Star history. He became the first player in All-Star history to have a leadoff home run off of starter Rick Reuschel of the San Francisco Giants. Wade Boggs followed with another home run, become the only two players in All-Star history to have back-to-back home runs. In his next at bat, Jackson grounded out 6-4, scoring Texas’ Ruben Sierra. He had a single in the fourth inning off of Montreal’s Tim Burke. Jackson would play six innings in left field before being replaced by Boston’s Mike Greenfield. He was 2-4 with two RBIs in the game. Gubicza replaced Nolan Ryan in the fourth inning. He had one strikeout in a scoreless appearance that earned him the hold. The American League won the game 5-3 and Bo Jackson became the first Royals player to be named the Most Valuable Player of the All-Star Game.

1990 – July 10 – Hosted by the Chicago Cubs (NL)
Bret Saberhagen was the sole representative the the Kansas City Royals for the American League. He was brought in during the fifth inning to replace pitcher Dave Stieb. Saberhagen had one strikeout and face the minimum of six batters during his two innings of relief. The American League won the game 2-0 and Saberhagen became the first Royals pitcher to earn the win for an All-Star Game.

1991 – July 9 – Hosted by the Toronto Blue Jays (AL)
Danny Tartabull became the first Royals player to be selected to start an All-Star Game as designated hitter. He was 0-2 with a strikeout. He was the sole representative for Kansas City.

1992 – July 14 – Hosted by the San Diego Padres (NL)
Jeff Montgomery was selected as the sole representatives for the Royals in his first-ever All-Star appearance. He was brought into the game in the bottom of the eighth inning to replace Cleveland’s Charles Nagy. After getting a ground out the start the inning, Montgomery gave up a pair of singles to Philadelphia’s John Kruk and Cincinnati’s Bip Roberts (future Royals player). He was then able to get St. Louis’ Tom Pagnozzi to ground out, but then Will Clark of the San Francisco Giants hit a three-run home run. Montgomery was removed from the game during an inning and was replaced by Rick Aguilera of Minnesota. The American League won 13-6.

1993 – July 13 – Hosted by the Baltimore Orioles (AL)
Jeff Montgomery was yet again the sole representative of the Kansas City Royals at the midsummer classic. He replaced New York’s Jimmy Key and retired the side with one strikeout in the seventh inning. He was replaced in the eighth inning by Minnesota’s Rick Aguilera.

1994 – July 12 – Hosted by the Pittsburgh Pirates (NL)
David Cone was the only player selected for the American League Team in 1994. There was some controversy about who would start the game. Many expected Cone to start, but Toronto Manager Cito Gaston chose New York’s Jimmy Key over Cone. Cone came into the game in the third inning. He gave up a double to San Diego’s Tony Gwynn, scoring Houston’s Jeff Bagwell and St. Louis’ (and former Royals player) Gregg Jefferies. Then, after striking out San Francisco’s Barry Bonds, he gave up a single to New York’s Mike Piazza to score Gwynn. Cone returned in the fourth inning, gave up one hit to St. Louis’ Ozzie Smith, but was able to get out of the inning without another run scored. The American League lost 8-7 in 10 innings.

1995 – July 11 – Hosted by the Texas Rangers (AL)
Kevin Appier was selected to his first-ever All-Star Game. He was the sole representative for Kansas City. Appier came into the game in relief in the third inning for starter Randy Johnson of Seattle. He faced six batters and had one strikeout.

1996 – July 9 – Hosted by the Philadelphia Phillies (NL)
Jeff Montgomery was the sole selection of the Royals to the All-Star team. He did not have a chance to pitch.

1997 – July 8 – Hosted by the Cleveland Indians (AL)
Royals starter Jose Rosado was selected to his first All-Star Game as the only Royals player. He came into the game in relief of Toronto’s Pat Hentgen in the seventh inning. He gave up a solo home run to Atlanta catcher Javy Lopez, tying the game. He gave up a single and a walk, but was able to get through the rest of the inning without giving up any other runs. The American League retook the lead in the bottom of the seventh inning and won the game 3-1. Rosado had the first blown save by a Royals pitcher in All-Star Game history and earned the win.

1998 – July 7 – Hosted by the Colorado Rockies (NL)
Third baseman Dean Palmer was the sole selection to the American League team. He came into the game in the seventh inning as a pinch hitter for Texas pitcher John Wetteland and grounded into a 6-4-3 double play. He was then replaced by former Royals pitcher Tom Gordon and never played in the field.

1999 – July 13 – Hosted by the Boston Red Sox (AL)
Jose Rosado was picked to represent the Royals in his second All-Star selection. He came into the game in the sixth inning to relieve Baltimore pitcher Mike Mussina. Rosado retired the side, striking out one.

2000 – July 11 – Hosted by the Atlanta Braves (NL)
Jermaine Dye and Mike Sweeney were selected to their first All-Star Game appearances. Dye was the first outfielder since Bo Jackson to play as a starter. Dye played four innings in right field, went 1-3 batting with a walk and a strikeout before being replaced by Chicago’s Magglio Ordonez. Mike Sweeney entered the game in the sixth inning as a pinch hitter for Chicago pitcher James Baldwin. Sweeney reached first because of a throwing error by Cincinnati shortstop Barry Larkin. Sweeney later scored off a single by New York’s Derek Jeter.

2001 – July 10 – Hosted by the Seattle Mariners (AL)
Mike Sweeney was the sole selection of the Royals to the All-Star Team. He replaced Oakland’s Jason Giambi at first base in the seventh inning, played three innings and went 0-1 hitting.

2002 – July 9 – Hosted by the Milwaukee Brewers (NL)
Mike Sweeney was again the only Royals player in the All-Star Game. He came into the game in the eighth inning to replace Chicago’s Paul Konerko at first base. He played four innings and was 0-1 at the plate. The game ended in the 11th inning a 7-7 tie.

2003 – July 15 – Hosted by the Chicago White Sox (AL)
Mike Sweeney and Mike MacDougal were both selected to the American League All-Star Team. MacDougal became only the third relief pitcher picked to the team after Dan Quisenberry and Jeff Montgomery. Neither player had an appearance in the game.

2004 – July 13 – Hosted by the Houston Astros (NL)
Ken Harvey was the only Royals player selected to the All-Star Team. He came into the game in the third inning as a pinch hitter for American League starter Mark Mulder of Oakland. He was struck out by future Hall-of-Famer Randy Johnson. Harvey did not play in the field.

2005 – July 12 – Hosted by the Detroit Tigers (AL)
Mike Sweeney was the only player for the Royals this season. He is only the second player after Danny Tartabull to bat as a designated hitter in the All-Star Game. He came into the game as a pinch hitter for Boston’s David Ortiz.Sweeney struck out swinging. He would not get another at bat.

2006 – July 11 – Hosted by the Pittsburgh Pirates (NL)
Starting pitcher Mark Redman was selected as the sole representative of the Kansas City Royals. He did not pitch.

2007 – July 10 – Hosted by the San Francisco Giants (NL)
Starting pitcher Gil Meche was selected as the sole representative of the Kansas City Royals. He did not pitch.

2008 – July 15 – Hosted by the New York Yankees (AL)
Joakim Soria became the third-ever relief pitcher selected to the All-Star Team. He was the sole representative for Kansas City in his first-ever All-Star appearance. He was brought into the game in the 11th inning for New York reliever Mariano Rivera. He gave up a leadoff single, then had a strikeout and two flyouts to end the inning. The American League won the game 4-3 in 15 innings.

2009 – July 14 – Hosted by the St. Louis Cardinals (NL)
Starting pitcher Zack Greinke was the only Royals player selected to the All-Star Team. He came into the game in relief of Chicago’s Mark Buehrle in the fourth inning and retired the side with two strikeouts.

2010 – July 13 – Hosted by the Anaheim Angels (AL)
Relief pitcher Joakim Soria was selected as the sole representative of the Kansas City Royals. He did not pitch.

2011 – July 12 – Hosted by the Arizona Diamondbacks (NL)
Rookie middle relief pitcher Aaron Crow was selected as the sole representative of the Kansas City Royals. He did not pitch. He is the first relief pitcher that was not a closer selected to the All-Star team in Royals history.

2012 – July 10 – Hosted by the Kansas City Royals (AL)
Billy Butler was selected to his only All-Star Team. He was the first player to have an at bat in an All-Star Game since Mike Sweeney in 2005. He came into the game as a pinch hitter for Boston’s David Ortiz in the seventh inning. He had two at bats, a ground out and a strikeout.

2013 – July 16 – Hosted by the New York Mets (NL)
For the first time since 1987, the Royals had three players on the All-Star Team: Alex Gordon, Greg Holland, and Salvador Perez. Holland ended the game in the top of the seventh in relief of Oakland’s Grant Balfour. He was able to get a ground out before giving up a single to New York’s David Wright. Holland was then taken out of the game and replaced by Toronto’s Brett Cecil. Gordon came into the game in the bottom of the seventh inning to replace Baltimore’s Adam Jones. Gordon played three innings in left field and was 0-1 batting. Perez also came into the game in the bottom of the seventh inning, replacing Minnesota’s Joe Mauer at catcher. He also played three innings. He hit a single in the eighth inning off of Atlanta’s Craig Kimbrel. He later scored off a ground-rule double from Cleveland’s Jason Kipnis. The American League won the game 3-0 and Holland earned a hold.

2014 – July 15 – Hosted by the Minnesota Twins (AL)
Again, the Royals had three selections to the All-Star Team. Alex Gordon, Greg Holland, and Salvador Perez were again selected as reserve players. However, starting catcher Matt Wieters of Baltimore could not play due to injury, so Perez became the first player since 2000 to start an All-Star game. Perez played four innings as catcher and was 0-1 batting. Holland was brought into the game in the seventh inning in relief of Boston’s Koji Uehara. He retired the side with one strikeout and earned a hold in the 5-3 victory for the American League. Gordon did not play.

2015 – July 14 – Hosted by the Cincinnati Reds (NL)
The Royals broke the 1979 record by having four players selected to start the All-Star Game. Salvador Perez started as catcher, Alcides Escobar started at shortstop and Lorenzo Cain started in right field. Alex Gordon was also selected to start in left field, but could not play due to injury. The Royals also had Wade Davis and Kelvin Herrera selected as reserves. Mike Moustakas was selected by the fans in a final vote. The seven players were the most in franchise history. Perez, Escobar and Cain each played four innings in the field. Perez was 0-2 with two strikeouts in the game. Escobar was 1-2 in the game with a single. Cain was 2-3 with a double and a RBI. He hit a single off of San Francisco’s Madison Bumgarner in the third inning and a RBI double in the fifth inning off of Los Angeles’ Clayton Kershaw to score the Angels’ Albert Pujols. Wade Davis came into the game in relief in the eighth inning to relieve New York’s Dellin Betances. He struck out two and gave up a single in one inning pitched. Mike Moustakas came in as a pinch hitter for Baltimore’s Manny Machado in the ninth inning and struck out. Herrera did not pitch. Manager Ned Yost became the first Royals manager since 1986 to lead the American League Team. The American League won the game 6-3.

2016 – July 12 – Hosted by the San Diego Padres (NL)
Ned Yost became the first manager in Royals history to coach two American League All-Star Teams. Four players were selected to the All-Star Team. Salvador Perez and Eric Hosmer were selected as starters while Kelvin Herrera and Wade Davis were each selected as reserve pitchers. Davis did not pitch due to injury. Hosmer played six innings at first base while Perez played five as catcher. In Hosmer’s first at bat, he hit a solo home run off of Giants’ starting pitcher (and former Royals pitcher) Johnny Cueto. His home run was the first by a Royals player since Bo Jackson’s blast in 1989. Then, after a single by Boston’s Mookie Betts, Salvador Perez hit a two-run home run off of Cueto. In the third inning, Hosmer hit a RBI single off of Miami’s Jose Fernandez, scoring Toronto’s Edwin Encarnacion. In the sixth inning, Herrera relieved Chicago’s Jose Quintana and retired the side with one strikeout. The American League won the game 4-2, with all runs scored by Royals players. Herrera earned a hold. Eric Hosmer was the Most Valuable Player of the All-Star Game, only the second Royals player ever to win the honor.

Tavish Whiting is an American Government teacher in Lee's Summit, MO

 

 

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Author: Tavish Whiting

I am an American Government teacher at Lee's Summit North High School

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