Ranking the Royals – Player Ranking #300-271

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We would like to welcome you to a new series here at Royals Blue. We will continue to post segments breaking down the 300 best players to ever play for Kansas City. There will be some familiar names, some not so familiar, and probably a few surprises along the way. 

These are the Top 300 Kansas City Royals Players ranked in descending order.  Each player's ranking is based on the Modified Production Index Formula (MPIF).  Position players and pitchers, respectively, have a formula that is used to rank their overall contribution to the Kansas City Baseball Franchise in their Royals' career.  The position player and pitching formula are located HERE.

 

The following players, ranked from #300 to 271, have biographical and statistical information about their tenure in Kansas City.

 

RANK #300 – JIM YORK (#40) – Middle Relief Pitcher (1970-1971)
PERFORMANCE INDEX: 362.04
50th Royals Player in Franchise History

York was selected in the 16th round of the free-agent draft in 1969. He made his major league debut with the Kansas City Royals on September 21, 1970, becoming the first franchise player originally signed by the Royals in their first draft to actually play. By 1971, he was a major part of the bullpen, appearing in 53 games and posting a 2.89 ERA. On July 24, 1971, he replaced the starting pitcher in the second inning and went on to pitch eight scoreless innings with 8 strikeouts. He played for two seasons with 109 strikeouts in just over 100 innings pitched. He was eventually traded, along with Lance Clemons, to the Houston Astros for first baseman John Mayberry.

RANK #299 – LYNN JONES (#35) – Utility Outfield (1984-1986)
PERFORMANCE INDEX: 365.48
208th Royals Player in Franchise History

Lynn Jones signed as a free agent to the Kansas City Royals in 1983 after playing for the Detroit Tigers. Jones only played a limited number of games in 1984 due to injury, but hit a very respectable .301 batting average. In 1985, Jones made 110 appearances, primarily as defensive relief throughout the outfield. His best game came in a 9-8 victory over the Baltimore Orioles on May 8, 1985 when, starting in right field, Jones wend 3-4 with a double and four RBIs. Lynn made postseason appearances in both 1984 and 1985 for the Royals. In Game 4 of the 1985 World Series, Jones had a double, as a pinch hitter, batting for pitcher Joe Beckwith. In 1986, Jones only had 47 at bats in 67 appearances. He was released at the end of the 1986 season having hit a .228 batting average in 224 appearances for the Kansas City Royals.

RANK #298 – MARK HUISMANN (#38) – Middle Relief Pitcher (1983-1986)
PERFORMANCE INDEX: 373.44
198th Royals Player in Franchise History

Mark Huismann was signed as a non-drafted free agent by the Kansas City Royals in 1980. He made his major league debut for the Royals on August 16, 1983. For his first two season, he bounced back and forth from Kansas City and AAA Omaha. Huismann pitched in relief in Game 1 of the ALCS against the Detroit Tigers in 1984. By 1985, he spent the vast majority of the season at AAA Omaha and was only called up in September for nine appearances. He did, however, win league Pitcher-of-the-Year honors while at Omaha. He was traded early in the 1986 season to the Seattle Mariners for a minor league outfielder. He would finish his Royals career with a 6-5 record and a 4.19 ERA in 70 appearances.

RANK #297 – CORY BAILEY (#58) – Middle Relief Pitcher (2001-2002)
PERFORMANCE INDEX: 375.35
504th Royals Player in Franchise History

Cory Bailey signed with the Kansas City Royals in 2001 after being a part of the Pittsburgh Pirates organization. Bailey had played in the major leagues during six seasons between 1993 and 1998, but was demoted to AAA minors for two years before having a second chance to play in the majors. Bailey made the most of his second opportunity, appearing in 53 games in 2001 and pitching a 3.48 ERA in 67 1/3 innings. Bailey had 13 holds for the Royals in his first season and struck out 61. His best game came on August 5, 2001 when he struck out three in one inning of relief in a 10-5 win over the Minnesota Twins. Bailey split time with AAA Omaha in 2002 with a 4.11 ERA and 3-4 record as a relief pitcher. Bailey was granted free agency at the end of the season and he went on to pitch in Japan.

RANK #296 – FELIPE PAULINO (#59) – Starting Pitcher (2011-2012)
PERFORMANCE INDEX: 377.78
737th Royals Player in Franchise History

The Kansas City Royals purchased the contract of Felipe Paulino from the Colorado Rockies in May of 2011. Paulino made 20 starts in 21 appearances in 2011 posting a 4.11 ERA and a 4-6 record in 124 2/3 innings. Despite only being with the Royals for part of the season, he was second on the team in strikeouts with 119. His best game came on September 10, 2011 when he struck out 11 in seven innings to earn the 4-2 win over the Seattle Mariners. He got off to a hot start in 2012 with seven starts and a 1.67 ERA. But an elbow strain placed him on the disabled list. He went through Tommy John surgery and missed the rest of the 2012 and all of the 2013 season. Paulino was released after the 2013 season and was signed by Chicago White Sox. Paulino was 7-7 with the Royals and had a 3.63 ERA in 28 appearances.

RANK #295 – MARK DAVIS (#48) – Middle Relief Pitcher (1990-1992)
PERFORMANCE INDEX: 379.29
281st Royals Player in Franchise History

Mark Davis signed as a free agent in 1990 after playing for the San Diego Padres. In 1989, while in San Diego, Mark Davis won the Cy Young Award for the National League. He signed with the Royals for $10,000,000, one of the highest in the major leagues. With his arrival, the Royals became the first team in history to have both of the previous year’s Cy Young Award winners on the same team (Bret Saberhagen being the American League winner). For the first two weeks of 1990, Davis was the closer for the Royals. By the end of the month, Davis developed major control problems and his closer position was handed over to Jeff Montgomery. He struggled over the next two seasons in the bullpen. At the end of 1991, the Royals gave him opportunities as a starter with some success. He posted a 2.22 ERA in five starts in 1991 with a 3-1 record. However, he began the 1992 season in the rotation and went 0-2 with a 9.60 ERA in four starts. He was sent back to the bullpen with limited success. He was traded to the Atlanta Braves for former Royals player Juan Berenguer in July. He ended his Royals career with a overall 5.31 ERA and a record of 9-13. Many consider his signing to be one of the worst deals in major league history.

RANK #294 – BRIAN ANDERSON (#19) – Starting Pitcher (2003-2005)
PERFORMANCE INDEX: 383.68
558th Royals Player in Franchise History

Brian Anderson was traded to the Kansas City Royals by the Cleveland Indians for three minor league players and cash. He made his first start for the Royals on August 26, 2003 against the Texas Rangers and earn the 9-2 victory. He sparked the Royals by going 5-1 in seven starts with a 3.99 ERA. Anderson was picked to be the opening day starter for the Royals in 2004. In that game, he went five innings, gave up five runs, and did not get the decision in a 9-7 victory over the White Sox. In this, his first full season, he only went 6-12 with a lofty ERA of 5.64. On May 8, 2005, Anderson tore his elbow ligament, necessitating Tommy John surgery. He never recovered and his major league career ended. He went 12-15 over 246 1/3 innings with a 5.44 ERA with the Royals.

RANK #293 – RICKY BOTTALICO (#52) – Closing Pitcher (2000)
PERFORMANCE INDEX: 385.21
482nd Royals Player in Franchise History

Ricky Bottalico signed as a free agent to the Kansas City Royals in 2000 after playing with the Philadelphia Phillies. Bottalico struggled early in the season, having 7.50 ERA by the first of June. He finished the season with a 4.63 ERA and 16 saves in 62 appearances. His best game came in long relief in a 9-4 win over the Anaheim Angels, pitching three scoreless innings with three strikeouts and the three-inning save. At the end of the season, Bottalico resigned with the Philadelphia Phillies.

RANK #292 – BOBBY FLOYD (#15) – Utility Infield (1970-1974)
PERFORMANCE INDEX: 390.27
47th Royals Player in Franchise History

Bobby Floyd was traded to the Kansas City Royals from the Baltimore Orioles for pitcher Moe Drabowsky in 1970. Floyd bounced back and forth from Kansas City to AAA Omaha throughout his career. In 1972, Floyd was on the opening day roster at shortstop due to an injury to starter Freddie Patek. His best game was just after arriving in Kansas City on September 21, 1970. In the second game of a doubleheader, Floyd went 2-4 with a double and three RBIs as the Royals beat the Chicago White Sox 8-2. Floyd’s last season in the major league was in 1974, when he appeared in only 10 games. He had a career .227 batting average in 167 games played with the Royals, primarily as a backup at second base and third base.

RANK #291 – MAC SUZUKI (#17) – Starting Pitcher (1999-2001, 2002)
PERFORMANCE INDEX: 390.55
466th Royals Player in Franchise History

Makoto “Mac” Suzuki was the first Japanese player in Royals history. He was claimed off waivers from the New York Mets midway through the 1999 season. That year, Suzuki split as a starter and middle reliever. In 2000, Suzuki was added to the starting rotation, recording a 8-10 record with a 4.34 ERA in 29 starts. His best performance came on August 19, 2000 when he pitched a complete game shutout of the Baltimore Orioles. In late June of 2001, Suzuki was traded, along with Sal Fasano, to the Colorado Rockies for Brent Mayne. He would play with three different teams that season. He was re-signed by the Royals in 2002, but only pitched seven games before being demoted to AAA Omaha. His 2002 season would be the last in the major leagues. Suzuki pitched a total of 333 2/3 innings in his Royals career.

RANK #290 – TERRY PENDLETON (#6) – Designated Hitter (1998)
PERFORMANCE INDEX: 395.38
435th Royals Player in Franchise History

Former National League MVP Terry Pendleton was signed by the Royals as a free agent after playing for the Cincinnati Reds. He was brought to Kansas City as an experienced hitter to help mentor the young hitting roster of Kansas City. Pendleton was the designated hitter on opening day for the Kansas City Royals in 1998. He played in 40 games as the DH and a small amount of time at third base. He hit .257 for the Royals with three home runs for the season. His best game came on August 20, 1998 in an 8-2 victory over the Boston Red Sox. Pendleton hit 2-4 with a home run and four RBIs. Pendleton retired from major league baseball at the conclusion of the season.

RANK #289 – BRAD WELLMAN (#3) – Utility Infield (1988-1989)
PERFORMANCE INDEX: 396.61
255th Royals Player in Franchise History

Brad Wellman signed as a free agent in 1987 after playing for the Los Angeles Dodgers. He primarily played second base and shortstop in his two years with the Royals with a .246 batting average in 174 games played. On September 11, 1988, Wellman hit the 51st-ever franchise inside-the-park home run off of the Oakland Athletics. In 1989, he was the primary backup for the aging Frank White and appeared in 62 games at second base. Wellman ended his major league career at the end of the 1989 season.

RANK #288 – BUTCH DAVIS (#33) – Left Field (1983-1984)
PERFORMANCE INDEX: 396.90
199th Royals Player in Franchise History

Butch Davis was drafted by the Kansas City Royals in 1980. He made his major league debut for the Royals on August 23, 1983. In only 33 games played in 1983, Butch Davis tied with three others Royals players as the team leader in triples with six. He had an amazing first season, batting .344 with two home runs and 18 RBIs. He became the Royals’ opening day starter in left field in 1984, but his success was short lived. He only hit .147 and was demoted to AAA Omaha by mid-July. He continued to stay in the minor leagues for the next two years until he was finally released in 1986 and signed with the Pittsburgh Pirates.

RANK #287 – CHUCK KNOBLAUCH (#11) – Left Field (2002)
PERFORMANCE INDEX: 401.01
517th Royals Player in Franchise History

Chuck Knoblauch signed as a free agent in 2001 after playing for the Minnesota Twins. He was named the leadoff batter on the 2002 opening day for the Royals. Knoblauch season start was like a bang. He hit a grand slam on April 9, 2002 off of Tim Wakefield of the Boston Red Sox. However, from there, things began to go down fast. On June 1, his batting average was only .179. Knoblauch suffered from a condition many players call “the yips,” in which he began to lose control of fielding the ball or throwing. His fielding deteriorated, which caused him to struggle at the plate. The Royals chose not to re-sign Knoblauch and he retired from baseball. He ended his Royals season with a .210 batting average.

RANK #286 – KILA KA’AIHUE (#25) – First Base (2008-2011)
PERFORMANCE INDEX: 406.55
681st Royals Player in Franchise History

Kila Ka’aihue was the first native Hawaiian in Royals history. He was drafted by the Royals in 2002. He made his major league debut with the Royals on September 4, 2008 against the Oakland Athletics. He was only called up for 12 games in 2008 and played the entire 2009 season at AAA Omaha. In 2010, he returned to the major leagues for part of the season. He showed power by hitting eight home runs, but only had a .217 batting average. His best game came September 28, 2010 in a 10-1 victory against the Minnesota Twins. He went 3-3 with one walk, two home runs, four runs and four RBIs. In 2011, the Royals planned on starting rookie Eric Hosmer at first base, but due to an injury, the Royals promoted Ka’aihue to the position on opening day. However, Ka’aihue only hit .195 batting average and he was demoted to AAA Omaha. At the end of the season, he was traded to the Oakland Athletics for a minor league player. Ka’aihue hit a career .216 batting average with the Royals with 11 home runs in 87 games played.

RANK #285 – LEO NUNEZ (#46) – Middle Relief Pitcher (2005-2008)
PERFORMANCE INDEX: 407.80
605th Royals Player in Franchise History

Leo Nunez’s real name is Juan Carlos Oviedo. From the Dominican Republic, Oviedo lied about his age and assumed the name of his friend “Leo Nunez” in order to receive a more lucrative contract. He initially was drafted by the Pittsburgh Pirates in 2000, but was traded to the Kansas City Royals in 2004 in exchange for Benito Santiago. Nunez made his major league debut on May 9, 2005 against the Toronto Blue Jays. Nunez struggled out of the bullpen with a 7.55 ERA in his first season. He spent much of the 2006 and 2007 seasons in AA Wichita and AAA Omaha. In 2008, Nunez received more playing time in Kansas City with a record of 4-1 and a 2.98 ERA. After the 2008 season, he was traded to the Florida Marlins for Mike Jacobs. Nunez went 9-7 with a 4.92 ERA in 106 appearances with the Royals over four seasons.

RANK #284 – BLAKE WOOD (#38) – Middle Relief Pitcher (2010-2011)
PERFORMANCE INDEX: 407.85
710th Royals Player in Franchise History

Blake Wood was drafted by the Kansas City Royals in 2006. He made his major league debut as a relief pitcher on May 12, 2010. Wood pitched brilliantly in his first month with an ERA of 1.54. But after that, his performance dropped and his ERA ended with a 5.07 on the season. His second season was much improved. He pitched 3.75 for the season in 69 2/3 innings and a 5-3 record as a reliever. He even had a rare relief-pitcher at bat on July 3, 2011 against the Colorado Rockies. Wood was released at the end of the season and picked up off waivers by the Cleveland Indians. He had a career 4.30 ERA in 106 relief appearances for the Royals. Today, Wood is pitching for the Cincinnati Reds.

RANK #283 – GLENDON RUSCH (#53) – Starting Pitcher (1997-1999)
PERFORMANCE INDEX: 411.009
413th Royals Player in Franchise History

Glendon Rusch was drafted by the Kansas City Royals in 1993. He made his major league debut on April 6, 1997, when he pitched eight scoreless innings against the Minnesota Twins and he earned his first win. His success was short lived as his ERA rose. He started in 27 games with a 5.50 ERA during the 1997 season. His 1998 season did not fare any better as Rusch’s record dropped to 6-15. He spent nearly the entire 1999 season at AAA Omaha, only being called up for three relief appearances. He was traded in September to the New York Mets for pitcher Dan Murray. He finished with a 12-25 record in 329 innings pitched with the Royals.

RANK #282 – CHUCK HARRISON (#7) – First Base (1969-1971)
PERFORMANCE INDEX: 411.101
1st Royals Player in Franchise History (along with Jerry Adair, Wally Bunker, Joe Foy, Jackie Hernandez, Ed Kirkpatrick, Bob Oliver, Lou Piniella, and Ellie Rodriguez)

Chuck Harrison was the first Royals player to play at first base. His contract was purchased from the Atlanta Braves in 1968. Despite being on the opening day roster for the first-ever Royals game, Harrison was relegated to backup first baseman and pinch hitter for much of the 1969 season. In 1970, Harrison spent his entire season playing in the minors before being called up again in 1971. Harrison hit a Royals career .219 in 124 games. His best game came on July 28, 1971 when he went 3-4 with a home run and three RBIs. Harrison ended his major league career with the Kansas City Royals.

RANK #281 – LEON ROBERTS (#16) – Utility Outfield (1983-1984)
PERFORMANCE INDEX: 413.94
193rd Royals Player in Franchise History

Leon Roberts was traded by the Toronto Blue Jays to the Kansas City Royals for minor league player Cecil Fielder. Roberts played as a backup outfielder for the 1983 season with 84 appearances. He hit .258 with eight home runs in his first season in Kansas City. Roberts had a very slow start with the Royals, but by mid-July he became a hot bat for the Royals. By 1984, Roberts’ offensive production dropped to only a .222 batting average. He was asked to pitch for the Royals on July 3, 1984. Roberts gave up three runs and made one strikeout in an inning pitched. Roberts was released at the end of the season, finishing his major league career.

RANK #280 – CHAD KREUTER (#19) – Catcher (1999)
PERFORMANCE INDEX: 414.31
455th Royals Player in Franchise History (along with Rey Sanchez)

Chad Kreuter signed in 1998 with the Kansas City Royals as a free agent after playing for the Anaheim Angels. He was named the opening day catcher in 1999. Kreuter had mediocre hitting in his one season with the Royals, only hitting .225 with five home runs in 85 starts as catcher. His best game came May 19, 1999 against the Oakland Athletics. He hit 4-4 with a double and five RBIs. Kreuter was not re-signed and was picked up by the Los Angeles Dodgers. He played a total of 107 games for the Royals and logged 767 1/3 innings as catcher.

RANK #279 – HUBIE BROOKS (#30) – Utility Outfield (1993-1994)
PERFORMANCE INDEX: 415.74
349th Royals Player in Franchise History (along with Rey Sanchez)

Veteran Hubie Brooks signed as a free agent in 1993 after playing for the California Angels. He spent many years with the Montreal Expos as was a two-time all star outfielder. He made 109 appearances with the Royals over two seasons with a .274 batting average He was used half of his games in 1993 as a pinch hitter, batting .303 in that situation. In 1994, he was used almost exclusively as a pinch hitter, but batting under .220 for most of the first half of the season. However, on June 13, 1994, Brooks hit a grand slam against the California Angels. He was released in mid-July of 1994 to make room for Wally Joyner’s return from the disabled list. This ended his major league career.

RANK #278 – RAMON RAMIREZ (#56) – Middle Relief Pitcher (2008)
PERFORMANCE INDEX: 417.44
667th Royals Player in Franchise History

Ramon Ramirez was traded to the Kansas City Royals by the Colorado Rockies for starting pitcher Jorge de la Rosa. Ramirez instantly became a major part of the Royals’ bullpen, making 71 appearances in 2008. His season was up and down. He began the season with a 0.69 ERA in his first 13 games. Then he had 6.08 ERA in his next 13 games, recovering with a 2.08 ERA for the final part of the season. Ramirez, along with middle relief pitcher Ron Mahay, became very effective setup men for closer Joakim Soria. Ramirez had 19 holds in the season with an overall ERA of 2.64 and 70 strikeouts in 71 1/3 innings. Ramirez was traded to the Boston Red Sox at the end of the season for outfielder Coco Crisp.

RANK #277 – SHANE HALTER (#4) – Utility Player (1997-1998)
PERFORMANCE INDEX: 422.59
414th Royals Player in Franchise History

Shane Halter was drafted by the Kansas City Royals in 1991. His major league debut with the Royals was on April 6, 1997 against the Minnesota Twins. Halter was a very versatile player who could play any position. In his rookie year, he played six different positions including designated hitter. He was also used as a pinch runner numerous times throughout the season. He made 74 appearances with a .276 batting average. In 1998, he appeared in 86 games. His best game was on April 11, 1998 when he started at shortstop, batting 2-4 with a double and two RBIs in a losing effort to the Minnesota Twins. On July 17, Halter pitched one inning against the Seattle Mariners. Halter was traded to the New York Mets in March of 1999 for a minor league player. In his career, Halter played every position for the Royals except catcher.

RANK #276 – CURT WILKERSON (#26) – Utility Infield (1992-1993)
PERFORMANCE INDEX: 422.74
325th Royals Player in Franchise History

Curt Wilkerson signed as a free-agent in 1992 after playing for the Pittsburgh Pirates. He played as a backup second baseman and shortstop for 111 games in 1992. Wilkerson finished the 1992 season with 18 stolen bases and a .250 batting average. His best series as a Kansas City Royal was at home against Oakland between July 31 and August 2 of 1992. In that series, he went 8-11 with three runs, two RBIs and a stolen base. He only played for two months in 1993 before being demoted to AAA Omaha. With this demotion, Wilkerson ended his major league career.

RANK #275 – A.J. HINCH (#7) – Catcher (2001-2002)
PERFORMANCE INDEX: 422.84
503rd Royals Player in Franchise History

In 2001, A.J. Hinch arrived in Kansas City in a complex three-team trade. Hinch and Angel Berroa were sent to Kansas City from the Oakland Athletics. The Tampa Bay Devil Rays sent Roberto Hernandez to Kansas City and Cory Lidle to Oakland. Oakland sent Ben Grieve to Tampa Bay and Kansas City sent Johnny Damon and Mark Ellis to Oakland. Hinch split his first season between Kansas City and AAA Omaha. While with the Royals, split time as the team’s catcher with Brent Mayne, Hector Ortiz and Gregg Zaun. His batting average of .157 was the lowest of four-catcher rotation of the Royals. However, he played his best game in his second-ever game with the Royals on April 8, 2001 when he went 1-4 with a home run and three RBIs in a 15-4 blowout of the Minnesota Twins. In Hinch’s second season with the Royals, he became the primary backup catcher to Brent Mayne, logging 527 1/3 innings on the backstop. His batting average improved to .249 and he produced seven home runs in 49 hits. Hinch was released by the Royals at the end of the 2002 season and he signed a minor league contract with the Cleveland Indians. Today, Hinch is the manager of the Houston Astros.

RANK #274 – HARMON KILLEBREW (#3) – Designated Hitter (1975)
PERFORMANCE INDEX: 423.72
97th Royals Player in Franchise History

In 1975, the Kansas City Royals signed Harmon Killebrew to a one-year contract after being released by the Minnesota Twins. He became the first truly full-time designated hitter in Royals history and appeared as the opening day DH for 1975. Killebrew played as a designated hitter in 92 games that season, but only had a .199 batting average and 14 home runs. On May 4, 1975, the Kansas City Royals played their last game in a three-game series in Minnesota. At that game, the Twins retired his jersey. During that game, Killebrew went 2-3 with a walk, a homerun and two RBIs. Killebrew received a standing ovation. Killebrew retired after the 1975 season a was elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1984.

RANK #273 – LINDY MCDANIEL (#41) – Middle Relief Pitcher (1974-1975)
PERFORMANCE INDEX: 430.38
89th Royals Player in Franchise History

Veteran pitcher Lindy McDaniel was traded to the Kansas City Royals from the New York Yankees in 1973 for Lou Piniella and Ken Wright. He was primarily a middle relief pitcher in the 1974 season with five spot-starts in late June and early July. He had a 3.46 ERA for the season with a 1-4 record in 106 2/3 innings pitched. In the first of his rare starts for the Royals, McDaniel pitched a complete game 4-1 win over the Oakland Athletics. McDaniel had four strikeouts and only one earned run in nine innings pitched. McDaniel pitched again in 1975 with a 4.15 ERA in 78 innings pitched. He retired from baseball with the Kansas City Royals after pitching in the major leagues since 1955.

RANK #272 – RYAN MADSON (#46) – Middle Relief Pitcher (2015)
PERFORMANCE INDEX: 432.36
801st Royals Player in Franchise History

Known as “Mad Dog,” Veteran pitcher Ryan Madson signed a one-year contract with Kansas City in 2015. Madson had not pitched in a major league game since September 28, 2011 due to season-ending Tommy John surgery during Spring Training with the Cincinnati Reds in 2012. In 2012, he signed with the Los Angeles Angels, but was still unable to play. He made the 25-man roster for the Royals in 2015 and became one of the most reliable relief pitchers on the best bullpen in major league baseball. Madson had a 2.02 ERA by the All-Star break and became one of the primary setup pitchers in the Royals bullpen. By the end of the season, he had a 3-1 record, 20 holds, and helped the Royals into the postseason for the second straight year. During the playoffs, he had six rough outings, giving up five earned runs in 5 1/3 innings pitched and a blown save. In the World Series, Madson shined, pitching three scoreless innings with five strikeouts and a win. Madson helped the Royals win their second-ever World Series. At the end of the season, Madson signed with the Oakland Athletics as a free agent.

RANK #271 – TIM SPEHR (#12) – Catcher (1991, 1997, 1998-1999)
PERFORMANCE INDEX: 433.69
311th Royals Player in Franchise History

Tim Spehr was drafted by the Kansas City Royals in 1988. A native of Excelsior Springs, MO, Spehr made his major league debut on July 18, 1991 in a game against the Baltimore Orioles. He was called up due to an injury to starting catcher Mike Macfarlane. In his first season, he batted .189 with three home runs in 74 at bats. On September 29, 1991, Tim Spehr hit a grand slam off of Jim Abbot of the California Angels. Spehr was not called up from the minors in the 1992 season and then was involved in a trade with the Montreal Expos that brought Mark Gardner to Kansas City. Spehr played the next four seasons as a backup catcher in Montreal before being traded to the Boston Red Sox. Weeks later, Boston sold his contract to the Royals. Now in his second stint with the Royals, Spehr made 17 appearances in 1997 as catcher, including catching on opening day. Having only a .171 batting average, the Royals released Spehr in May of 1997. Spehr was picked up by the Atlanta Braves for the remainder of the 1997 season. The next year, Spehr signed with the New York Mets and played a limited time for their team. In August, his contract was sold to the Kansas City Royals again. This third stint with the Royals was his best. Spehr was the primary backup catcher to Chad Kreuter, hitting nine home runs and driving in 26. The 1999 season would be his last in the major leagues.

 

 

Tavish Whiting is an American Government teacher in Lee's Summit, MO.

 

 

 

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Author: Tavish Whiting

I am an American Government teacher at Lee's Summit North High School

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